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市場調査レポート

鉄道・飛行機・ドローンの世界市場:市場シェア・戦略・予測 2015-2021年

Trains, Planes, and Drones Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2015-2021

発行 WinterGreen Research, Inc. 商品コード 336596
出版日 ページ情報 英文 1040 Pages
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鉄道・飛行機・ドローンの世界市場:市場シェア・戦略・予測 2015-2021年 Trains, Planes, and Drones Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2015-2021
出版日: 2015年07月30日 ページ情報: 英文 1040 Pages
概要

ドローン市場は力強い成長を示し、2014年に36億米ドルが見込まれ、2021年までに161億米ドルに達すると予測されています。商業用ドローンの農業市場は、その他の農業、牧場、および果樹園管理方法よりもコスト効果的であるため、大きく成長する見込みです。パッケージデリバリーは商業用ドローンの新生市場として発展しています。攻撃能力を持つ軍事用ドローン市場は急速に拡大する見込みです。ドローン市場はシステムが提供する経済的な可視化・ナビゲーションによって著しい成長を遂げると見込まれています。

当レポートでは、鉄道・飛行機・ドローンの世界市場に注目し、市場シェア、市場戦略および市場予測データを探るほか、市場の現況、発展への影響要因、製品および技術、有力企業などについての調査・分析情報をまとめています。

エグゼクティブサマリー

第1章 鉄道・飛行機・ドローン:市場概説・市場ダイナミクス

  • 輸送車両の遠隔操作への動き
  • 鉄道の遠隔操作
  • ドローン:商業用無人航空機 (UAS) の説明
  • 重要な戦略ロケーションへのUASの事前配置
  • ジオリファレンス画像
  • グローバル化と技術
  • 国境パトロール
  • UAS向けの、より軽量だがより強力な電源の開発

第2章 ドローン・無人航空機 (UAS) 市場シェアおよび予測

  • ドローン市場の促進因子
  • ドローン市場のシェア
  • ドローン市場の予測
  • 軍事用ドローン市場
  • 軍事用ドローン市場のシェア
  • 軍事用ドローン市場の予測
  • 軍事用ドローンの地域市場
  • 商業用無人航空機 (UAS) 市場のシェア
  • 商業用無人航空機 (UAS) 市場の予測
  • UASのペイロード
  • 無人航空機の地域市場分析

第3章 鉄道・飛行機・ドローン:遠隔航空管制システムおよび航空システムの製品説明

  • Cattron Group
  • Boeing
  • GoPro
  • GoPro
  • AeroVironment
  • Amazon
  • Textron
  • BAE Systems
  • Aurora Flight Sciences Hale
  • L-3 Communications の次世代精密UAS
  • Challis Heliplane UAV Inc.
  • Draganfly Innovations Inc. 、ほか

第4章 ドローン無人航空機 (UAS) 技術

  • 趣味もしくは商業用ドローンの操縦を学ぶ
  • 軍事用ドローン技術
  • Northrop Grumman.BAT のUAVオープンアーキテクチャー
  • GPSオペレーションの改善
  • IRGX
  • アンテナ追跡システム
  • ATPS 1200
  • 民間UAV
  • クラウドコンピューティング・マルチレイヤーセキュリティ、ほか

第5章 ドローン遠隔制御企業の説明

  • AeroVironment
  • ASN Technologies
  • Aurora Flight
  • Aviation Industry Corp (Avic)
  • BAE Systems
  • Boeing
  • Challis UAV Inc.
  • China Aerospace
  • Denel Dynamics
  • DJI 、ほか

WinterGreen Research Research の調査手法

図表リスト

目次
Product Code: SH26401914

Next generation drones leverage better technology, launching from ships anywhere. The technology is evolving better navigation, softer landings, longer flights, better ability to carry different payloads.

The drones are able to achieve military and commercial tasks. They have been evolving airfreight delivery systems capability. They are used for surveillance, reconnaissance and intelligence missions. They do 3D mapping, commercial pipeline observation, border patrol, package delivery, photography, and agriculture. These are more energy efficient, last longer and have a significantly lower cost of operation than manned aircraft.

Drone technology extends everywhere, even to airline control towers. Drones evolving technology is extending uses, even evolving to trains and planes. The use of Drone technology to control moving devices remotely extends the notion of drones, creating a larger potential drone market. Military drones will make every navy ship an aircraft carrier. They can be launched from anywhere, not needing an airfield.

In the recent Germanwings airline crash, the control tower knew for 10 minutes that the airliner was set to destruct with all the passengers on board but the controllers in the tower were powerless to help. This crash represents an instance of how security systems and sensors might be used from a control tower to effect remote control in response to a security issue.

Headlines like “Amtrak train derailed going 106 M.P.H. on sharp curve; at least 9 killed”, represent another instance of where remote control of a transport unit would improve safety in train operations. Remote monitoring. And remote piloting offer guidelines on the commercial use of unmanned aircraft systems . Drone commercial uses will provide billions of dollars in economic growth.

Drone unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology has reached a level of maturity that has put these systems at the forefront of aerospace manufacturing. Procurement around the world is adapting to drone availability. Use in the global war on terrorism has demonstrated unique usefulness for military intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and communications relay.

Relatively low-cost of drones make them work for civilian applications. Law enforcement, mapping, video making, movie making, environmental monitoring, and aerial survey become compelling applications in the future.

Drone aircraft are sophisticated and flexible. They take off, fly and land autonomously. They enable engineers to push the envelope of normal flight. Reconnaissance drones can fly for days continuously. Remote, ground-based pilots can work in shifts.

Removal of the need for an onboard pilot ushers in an era of low cost aerial craft called drones. The drone elimination of the need for human support systems on aircraft dramatically reduces the aircraft's size, complexity, and power requirements. The drones effectively reduce overall program cost, development time and risk. Many advanced flight technologies are for piloted craft. These are initially tested using unmanned subscale demonstrators.

Removing the pilot allows designers to simplify the aircraft's design and then test it at reduced risk. It allows configurations that would be impossible or impractical for human occupation.

A common issue with UAV platforms is the need to optimize these aircraft. UAV are used to carry useful payloads. These platforms are flexible as to payload, permitting interchangeable or additional sensors and other electronics, extra fuel or weapons systems. The sole function of an unmanned aircraft is to get to a target location, perform a task, and then return in the most efficient and cost-effective way. Without a pilot aboard, the return trip is optional. Light weight is central to UAV design.

NORTHROP GRUMMAN GLOBAL HAWK

                        Source: Northrop Grumman.

Drones represent a way to use air to travel faster and at less cost. The market is divided between military and commercial drones. Military drones represent the future of the national security presence for every nation. Increasing technology sophistication and lower costs are achieving dramatic market shifts.

Remote operation occurs in a control tower. The control tower knew for ten minutes that the Germanwings flight was headed for disaster and could do nothing about it, the same was true during the airliner participation in the 911 terrorist bombings. What this study is about is control towers that have the ability to stop trains, planes, and control drones.

Control towers are set to become a way of life and drones light the way. Other technologies will follow. If a train is approaching a curve at 100 miles per hour when it should be going 50 miles per hour, there in the future there will be a way to remotely take over the train and slow it or stop it.

If a plane is hijacked, if there is a bad guy in the pilot's seat, then in the future, the control tower will take over the plane. Drones lead the way in this regard. Drones provide a way to permit a plane to enter an airspace and to be controlled remotely. It is the drone technology that will be adopted by the trains and planes in the future of control tower expansion.

In this study, we illustrate how drones achieve doing work even though they are remotely controlled. Remote operation of trains is now possible. A speeding train can be stopped by trained staff watching remotely. The rules for this have yet to be fully implemented.

Transportation Trades AFL-CIO Endorses Federal Mandates To Require
At Least Two Crew Members On U.S. Freight Trains

                        Source: Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.

Drone market forecasts indicate strong growth anticipated Markets at $3.6 billion in 2014 are anticipated to reach $16.1 billion by 2021. A $3.6 billion market is substantial indicating the presence of many reference accounts for vendors. The wide variety of models and applications speak to the strong foothold in the market. With many vendors pushing products, the aggregate marketing will contribute to building a huge market for drones.

Commercial drone agricultural markets will grow significantly as the aircraft are able to perform more cost efficiently than other ways of farming, ranching, and orchard tending. Package delivery is evolving as a nascent market for commercial drones.

Military markets for drones with strike capability will grow rapidly. Every segment of drone market applications is poised for strong growth as the designs become more mature and vendors spread throughout the world..

Military drones will be used on ships to replace missiles. Drones will master becoming more elusive and able to fly faster to get out of the way of armies firing at them. Drones will be launched from the decks of ships and controlled remotely to deal with trouble anywhere.

Drones markets promise to grow significantly because of the more economical visualization and navigation provided by systems. Visualization includes mapping from the air, inspection from the air, surveillance from the air, and package delivery from the air. The unmanned aircraft equipped with cameras are able to do things that cannot be done in any other way. This bodes well for market development.

Unmanned aircraft systems promise to achieve a more significant aspect of commercial market presence. Army Unmanned Aircraft Systems flying of 3 million flight hours gives drones market credibility. Eighty eight percent of those hours were logged in combat situations in Iraq and Afghanistan, paving the way for commercial drone markets to develop.

According to Susan Eustis, leader of the team that prepared the study, “Quantities of fielded military and commercial systems of every size and description are set to increase. Every ship can become an aircraft carrier with drones, every commercial endeavor can be made to operate more efficiently with drones. Police departments, the oil and gas industry, border patrol, and utilities are all using commercial drones. Units are used for agriculture. Vendors continue to improve the capabilities of drone aircraft. Governments continue to improve the rules and regulations controlling drones. Their ability to support the military and commercial endeavors is increasing. Unmanned aircraft have fundamentally changed the accuracy of utility and oil and gas inspections. The drones are set to fundamentally change how agriculture is conducted.”

Table of Contents

DRONES, UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  • Drone Market Driving Forces
    • UAS Challenges
    • Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)
    • Drone Infrastructure Standards
  • Drone Market Shares
  • Drone Market Forecasts

1. TRAINS, PLANES, AND DRONES: MARKET DESCRIPTION AND MARKET DYNAMICS

  • 1.1. Moving Transport Vehicle Remote Operation
  • 1.2. Remote Operation Of Trains
    • 1.2.1. Remote Control Of Planes, Trains, And Drones
    • 1.2.2. Remote Control via Hacking Into An Airplane's Computer
    • 1.2.3. Train Crash
    • 1.2.4. Germanwings Crash: Co-pilot Suicide, Cockpit Doors Locked
  • 1.3. Drones: Commercial Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Description
    • 1.2.1. US FAA Issues
    • 1.3.2. Government Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)
    • 1.3.3. Military Drones Definition
  • 1.4. Pre-Position UASs In Key Strategic Locations
    • 1.4.1. Maritime Air Take-Off and Landing:
    • 1.4.2. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Aerial Refueling
    • 1.4.3. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Enhanced Capability and Payloads
    • 1.4.4. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Enhanced Resilience
    • 1.4.5. Small and Micro-UASs
    • 1.4.6. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Perimeter Surveillance
    • 1.4.7. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) Surveillance
  • 1.5. Georeferenced Imagery
    • 1.5.1. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Traffic Monitoring
    • 1.5.2. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Agriculture Mapping
    • 1.5.3. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Homeland Security
    • 1.5.4. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for Scientific Research
  • 1.6. Globalization and Technology
    • 1.6.1. Proliferation of Conventional Military Technologies
    • 1.6.2. UASs General Roles
  • 1.7. Border Patrol:
  • 1.8. Development Of Lighter Yet More Powerful Power Sources For UASs

2. DRONES, UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) MARKET SHARES AND FORECASTS

  • 2.1. Drone Market Driving Forces
    • 2.1.1. UAS Challenges
    • 2.1.2. Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)
    • 2.1.3. Drone Infrastructure Standards
    • 2.2. Drone Market Shares
    • 2.3. Drone Market Forecasts
    • 2.3.1. Drone Market Leaders And Potential Market Share To 2021...
    • 2.3.2. Commercial Drone Market Vertical Growth, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Insurance
    • 2.3.3. Drone Market Regional Growth
    • 2.3.4. Comparison in Growth of Commercial Vs. Defense Spending on Drones
    • 2.3.5. Market Growth Minis Vs. HALES/MALES?
  • 2.4. Military Drone Markets
    • 2.4.1. Military Drone Extended System Requirements
    • 2.4.2. Drone FAA Federal Aviation Regulations
    • 2.4.3. Military Drone Market Driving Forces
    • 2.4.4. US DoD Spending Trends
    • 2.4.5. US Military Budget
  • 2.5. Military Drone Market Shares
    • 2.5.1. Northrup Grumman
    • 2.5.2. General Atomics
    • 2.5.3. Textron A1A
    • 2.5.4. AeroVironment
    • 2.5.5. Boeing Insitu
    • 2.5.6. Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE:LMT)
    • 2.5.7. Prox Dynamics AS
    • 2.5.8. Denel Dynamics
    • 2.5.9. SAIC
    • 2.5.10. Israel Aerospace Industries
    • 2.5.11. General Dynamics Corporation
    • 2.5.12. Wing Loong Medium-Altitude Long-Endurance (MALE) Drone
    • 2.5.13. DJI
    • 2.5.14. Drone Upgrade Spending
    • 2.5.1. Military Drone Segments, Specific Drones and Their Vendors
    • 2.5.2. Military Drone Systems Market Segments: Persistent
    • 2.5.3. Military Penetrating Drone Systems Market Segments:
    • 2.5.4. Military Tactical Drone Systems Market Segments:
    • 2.5.5. Military Small Tactical Drone Systems Market Segments:
    • 2.5.6. Military Mini Drone Systems Market Segments:
    • 2.5.7. Military Drone Market Share Unit Analysis
    • 2.5.8. US Military Drone Systems Installed and Sold by Vendor and by Type of Drone Market Shares, Units and Dollars 193
  • 2.6. Military Drone Market Forecasts
    • 2.6.1. Military Drone Market Segment Forecasts
  • 2.7. Military Drone Regional Market
    • 2.7.1. US: Growing Demand For Use Of Drones
    • 2.7.2. US Defense Industry Initiatives DII-Related Initiatives
    • 2.7.3. US Navy
    • 2.7.4. US Air Force Drone Budget
    • 2.7.5. US Military to Spend $38.9 Billion On Drones And Unmanned Systems Over 7 Years
    • 2.7.6. Inventory of Unmanned Aerial Integrated Systems
    • 2.7.7. US Drone Roadmap Anticipates Substantial Growth
    • 2.7.8. US Military Drone Robot Technology Budget Requests
    • 2.7.9. Unmanned Ground Systems
    • 2.7.10. Unmanned Maritime Systems
    • 2.7.11. US Military Technology Investment
  • 2.8. Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
    • 2.8.1. Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
    • 2.8.2. Lockheed Martin
    • 2.8.3. BP and AeroVironment Launch FAA-Approved, Commercial Unmanned Aircraft Operations
    • 2.8.4. AeroVironment's Extensive Operational Track Record
    • 2.8.5. AeroVironment $11.2 Million Order for Raven Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Services
    • 2.8.6. Textron /AAI
    • 2.8.7. Textron Shadow®
    • 2.8.8. Aurora Flight Sciences Odysseus Solar-Powered Aircraft
    • 2.8.9. Insitu
    • 2.8.10. Draganflyer X4 UAV
    • 2.8.11. Boeing Insitu
    • 2.8.12. DRS Unmanned Technologies Ground Control Stations
    • 2.8.13. Proxy Aviation Systems
    • 2.8.14. Northrop Grumman Bat 3
    • 2.8.15. General Atomics Predator® UAS
    • 2.8.16. General Atomics Predator® B UAS
    • 2.8.17. Border Patrol / Law Enforcement Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
    • 2.8.18. Package Delivery Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares,
    • 2.8.19. Google Package Delivery
    • 2.8.20. Utility and Pipeline Inspection Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
    • 2.8.21. Agricultural Inspection and Planting Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
    • 2.8.22. Yamaha RMAX
    • 2.8.23. Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet
    • 2.8.24. Photography and Videography Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
  • 2.9. Commercial Drone Unmanned Aircraft Market Forecasts
    • 2.9.1. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Market Total Forecasts
    • 2.9.2. Small Commercial Drone Unmanned Aircraft Market Forecasts
    • 2.9.1. Mid-Size Commercial Drone Unmanned Aircraft Market Forecasts
    • 2.9.1. Small and Mid Size Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems
    • 2.9.2. Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Market Forecasts by Sector
    • 2.9.3. Commercial Drone UAS Wing Based Sub-segments
  • 2.10. Unmanned Aerial Systems Payloads
    • 2.10.1. Composites Key to UAV Utility
  • 2.11. Unmanned Airplane Regional Market Analysis
    • 2.11.1. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Industry Regional Summary
    • 2.11.2. U.S Accounts for 73 Percent Of The Worldwide Research, Development, Test, And Evaluation (RDT&E) Spending On UAV Technology
    • 2.11.3. UAS Marketplace Moving Target
    • 2.11.4. China
    • 2.11.5. China
    • 2.11.6. DoD Source Materials
    • 2.11.7. US Drone Research, Development, Test & Evaluation (RDT&E)
    • 2.11.8. US Drones for Aircraft Carriers
    • 2.11.9. Worldwide Trade In Drones
    • 2.11.10. Chinese Smog-Fighting Drones That Spray Chemicals To Capture Air Pollution
    • 2.11.11. China Desires Exports, Steps Up Research In Military Drones
    • 2.11.12. Drones for the Netherlands
    • 2.11.13. U.S. State Department Drone Export Guidelines
    • 2.11.14. Canada
    • 2.11.15. Singapore
    • 2.11.16. Brazil
    • 2.11.17. Morocco
    • 2.11.18. India
    • 2.11.19. Russia Develops Heavy Drone
    • 2.11.20. Russian Drones In the Skies In Ukraine

3. TRAINS, PLANES, AND DRONES: REMOTE FLIGHT CONTROL OF RAIL AND AERIAL SYSTEMS PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

  • 3.1. Cattron Group
    • 3.1.1. Cattron Group Remote Control Rail Applications
  • 3.2. Boeing
    • 3.2.1. Boeing Airliner Flight Control An Issue
    • 3.2.2. Boeing Airliner Remote Control Autopilot Patent
    • 3.2.3. Boeing / Insitu Integrator System
    • 3.2.4. Boeing A160 Hummingbird Helicopter
    • 3.2.5. Boeing Condor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
    • 3.2.6. Boeing ScanEagle Small Footprint UAS Solutions
    • 3.2.7. Boeing / Insitu / Commercial
    • 3.2.8. Insitu Arctic Ice Floe Monitoring
    • 3.2.9. Insitu Mammal Monitoring
    • 3.2.10. Insitu Pipeline Surveys
    • 3.2.11. Insitu Power-Line Inspections
    • 3.2.12. Insitu Geomagnetic Surveys
    • 3.2.13. Insitu Commercial Fishing
    • 3.2.14. Insitu Public Safety
    • 3.2.15. Insitu Disaster Response
    • 3.2.16. Insitu Search and Rescue
    • 3.2.17. Insitu Port and Border Security
    • 3.2.18. Insitu Communications Relay
    • 3.2.19. Insitu Over-the-Horizon Sensing
    • 3.2.20. Insitu Counter-Narcotics
    • 3.2.21. Insitu Offshore Base
    • 3.2.22. Insitu Defense
    • 3.2.23. Insitu Payload Systems
    • 3.2.24. Insitu Force Protection
    • 3.2.25. Insitu Combined Arms
    • 3.2.26. Insitu Research Future of UAS Operations and Technology
    • 3.2.27. Insitu ICOMC2 Streamline Process
    • 3.2.28. Insitu ICOMC2's Breakthrough Technology Extends Drone Capabilities
    • 3.2.29. Insitu Integrator
    • 3.2.30. Insitu NightEagle
    • 3.2.31. Boeing X-37B Space Shuttle
  • 3.3. GoPro
  • 3.4. AeroVironment
    • 3.4.1. AeroVironement Global Observer
    • 3.4.2. AeroVironement RQ-20A Puma AE
    • 3.4.3. AeroVironement Wasp AE
    • 3.4.4. AeroVironement Shrike VTOL
    • 3.4.5. AeroVironement Ground Control System
    • 3.4.6. BP and AeroVironment Launch FAA-Approved, Commercial Unmanned Aircraft Operations
    • 3.4.7. AeroVironment Integrated LiDAR Sensor Payload
    • 3.4.8. AeroVironment and Commercial UAV
    • 3.4.9. AeroVironment AV's Family of Small UAS
    • 3.4.10. AeroVironment Raven
  • 3.5. Amazon
  • 3.6. Textron
    • 3.6.1. Textron Shadow M2
    • 3.6.2. Textron One System Remote Video Terminal
    • 3.6.3. Textron Universal Ground Control Station
    • 3.6.4. Textron Aerosonde
    • 3.6.5. Textron / Aerosonde AAI Services
    • 3.6.6. Textron Systems AAI
    • 3.6.7. Textron Systems AAI RQ-7B Shadow® Tactical UAS Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)
    • 3.6.8. Textron Systems AAI Shadow® Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS)
    • 3.6.9. AAI Shadow 400 Unmanned Aircraft Deployed With Allied Naval Forces
    • 3.6.10. Textron Systems AAI Shadow 600 System
    • 3.6.11. Textron
    • 3.6.12. Textron Shadow® Reconnaissance, Surveillance
    • 3.6.13. Textron UAS Support
    • 3.6.14. Textron UAS Training
    • 3.6.15. Textron Systems AAI Ground Control Stations
    • 3.6.16. Textron Systems AAI Remote Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Terminals
    • 3.6.17. Textron Systems AAI / Aerosonde®
    • 3.6.18. Textron Systems AAI and Aeronautics Orbiter™
    • 3.6.19. Textron Systems AAI Ground Control Stations
    • 3.6.20. Textron Systems AAI Remote Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Terminals
    • 3.6.21. Textron Systems AAI One System Remote Video Terminal
    • 3.6.22. Textron Systems AAI Tactical Sensor Intelligence Sharing System
    • 3.6.23. Textron Systems Wasp Micro Air Vehicle (MAV)
    • 3.6.24. Textron Systems Homeland Security
    • 3.6.25. Nano Air Vehicle
  • 3.7. BAE Systems
    • 3.7.1. BAE Systems Demon UAV
    • 3.7.2. BAE Systems Drones
    • 3.7.3. BAE Systems Herti
    • 3.7.4. BAE Systems Image Collection and Exploitation (ICE) Sensor Management System
    • 3.7.5. BAE Systems Mantis
    • 3.7.6. BAE Systems MIM500™ Series of Uncooled Infrared Camera Cores
    • 3.7.7. BAE Systems Taranis
    • 3.7.8. BAE Systems Taranis - Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV)
    • 3.7.9. BAE Systems Telemos
  • 3.8. Aurora Flight Sciences Hale
    • 3.8.1. Aurora Centaur
    • 3.8.2. Aurora Orion
    • 3.8.3. Aurora SKATE - Small Unmanned Aircraft System
    • 3.8.4. Aurora's HALE
    • 3.8.5. Aurora's Advanced Concepts: SunLight Eagle - Green Flight
    • 3.8.6. Aurora's Excalibur
    • 3.8.7. Aurora GoldenEye 80 - Small, Capable Surveillance UAS
    • 3.8.8. Aurora GoldenEye 50
    • 3.8.9. Aurora GoldenEye 80
    • 3.8.10. Aurora's Advanced Concepts: UHATF
    • 3.8.11. Aurora Flight Sciences Odysseus Solar-Powered Aircraft
    • 3.8.12. Aurora Flight Sciences Orion HALL
    • 3.8.13. Aurora Flight Sciences Earth Science Applications
    • 3.8.14. Aurora Small Unmanned Aerial Systems
    • 3.8.15. Aurora Tactical Systems
    • 3.8.16. Aurora Diamond DA42 MPP
    • 3.8.17. Aurora System Description
  • 3.9. L-3 Communications Next Generation Precision Unmanned Aircraft Systems
    • 3.9.1. L-3 Communications Cutlass Tube-Launched Small UAS
    • 3.9.2. L-3 Cutlass Communications Small Expendable Tube-Launched UAS
    • 3.9.3. L-3's Mid-Tier UAS Programs
    • 3.9.4. L-3 Communications UAS APEX Programs
    • 3.9.5. L-3 Communications Medium Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Or Manned - Mobius
    • 3.9.6. L-3 Unmanned Systems' Viking 100 Runway Operations
    • 3.9.7. L-3 Communications Viking 300 Runway Operations
    • 3.9.8. L-3 Communications Viking 400
    • 3.9.9. L-3 Communications TigerShark
    • 3.9.10. L-3 Communications Generation IV Ground Control Station
    • 3.9.11. L-3 Communications On-board Precision Automated Landing System (O-PALS)
    • 3.9.12. L-3 Communications ISR Services
    • 3.9.13. L-3 Communications System Integration and Technical Support
  • 3.10. Challis Heliplane UAV Inc.
    • 3.10.1. Challis Heliplane UAV E950
  • 3.8. Draganfly Innovations Inc.
    • 3.8.1. Draganfly Draganflyer X4-P
    • 3.8.2. Draganfly Handheld Ground Control System
    • 3.8.3. Draganflyer Vision Based System (VBS)
    • 3.8.4. Draganflyer Guardian
    • 3.8.5. Draganfly X4
    • 3.8.6. Draganflyer X6
    • 3.8.7. Draganflyer Aerial Photography & Video Applications
    • 3.8.8. Draganflyer Real Estate Applications
    • 3.8.9. Draganflyer Law Enforcement Applications
    • 3.8.10. Draganflyer X8
  • 3.9. DRS Unmanned Technologies Ground Control Stations
    • 3.9.1. DRS Aircraft Monitoring Unit (AMU)
  • 3.10. General Atomics
    • 3.10.1. General Atomics Predator® B UAS
    • 3.10.2. General Atomics Certifiable Predator B RPA (Developmental)
    • 3.10.3. General Atomics Certifiable Predator B RPA Performance
    • 3.10.4. General Atomics Predator Jet Performance C Avenger® UAS
    • 3.10.5. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-1B Predator
    • 3.10.6. General Atomics Predator XP RPA
    • 3.10.7. General Atomics Gray Eagle UAS
    • 3.10.8. General Atomics Improved Gray Eagle (IGE) UAS
    • 3.10.1. General Atomics Gray Eagle™ UAS
    • 3.10.2. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems GA - Gray Eagle™ UAS
    • 3.10.3. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Claw® Sensor Control
    • 3.10.4. GA-ASI Athena RF Tag
  • 3.11. Integrated Dynamics
    • 3.11.1. Integrated Dynamics Rover
    • 3.11.2. Integrated Dynamics Explorer
    • 3.11.3. Integrated Dynamics Skycam
    • 3.11.4. Integrated Dynamics Pride
    • 3.11.5. Integrated Dynamics Spirit
    • 3.11.6. Integrated Dynamics Border Eagle MK - II
    • 3.11.7. Integrated Dynamics Hornet
    • 3.11.8. Integrated Dynamics HAWK MK - V
    • 3.11.9. Integrated Dynamics VISION UAV systems
    • 3.11.10. Integrated Dynamics VISION MK I
    • 3.11.11. Integrated Dynamics Vision M K - I I
    • 3.11.12. Integrated Dynamics S/Integrated Dynamics Integrated Dynamics M K - I
    • 3.11.13. Integrated Dynamics Vector
    • 3.11.14. Integrated Dynamics Tornado
    • 3.11.15. Integrated Dynamics Nishan MK - II
    • 3.11.16. Integrated Dynamics Nishan TJ - 1000
  • 3.12. MMIST Mist Mobility
    • 3.12.1. Sherpa Ranger / MMist
  • 3.13. Marcus UAV Systems
    • 3.13.1. Marcus Autopilots
  • 3.14. Proxy Aviation Systems
    • 3.14.1. Proxy PROTEUS™
    • 3.14.2. Proxy PACS
    • 3.14.3. The Proxy Autonomous Control Suite (PACS™) Virtual Pilot / Virtual Operator
    • 3.14.4. Proxy Cooperative Control/UDMS
    • 3.14.5. Proxy SkyRaider
  • 3.15. LaserMotive
    • 3.15.1. LaserMotive UAV Power Links
    • 3.15.2. LaserMotive Teams with Germany's Ascending Technologies
  • 3.16. China Aerospace Science & Industry Corp Jet-Powered WJ600
    • 3.16.1. Chinese Naval UAS
  • 3.17. ASN Technology Group
  • 3.18. Northrop Grumman / Scaled Composites
    • 3.18.1. Proteus
    • 3.18.2. Northrop Grumman MLB Company
    • 3.18.3. Northrop Grumman.Bat 3
    • 3.18.4. Northrop Grumman BAT 4 UAV
    • 3.18.5. Northrop Grumman V-BAT UAV
    • 3.18.6. Northrop Grumman Super Bat with Piccolo II Autopilot and TASE Gimbal
    • 3.18.7. Northrop Grumman Unmanned Aerial Systems
    • 3.18.8. Northrop Grumman Bat Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS)
    • 3.18.9. Northrop Grumman Firebird
    • 3.18.10. Northrop Grumman Persistent Multiple Intelligence Gathering Air System
    • 3.18.11. Northrop Grumman M324 UAS (Unmanned Aerial System)
    • 3.18.12. Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Block 20 Global Hawk
    • 3.18.13. Northrop Grumman Drone Program Overview
    • 3.18.14. Northrop Grumman Block 20 Global Hawk Specification
    • 3.18.15. Northrop Grumman Euro Hawk®
    • 3.18.16. Northrop Grumman Triton
    • 3.18.17. Northrop Grumman's MQ-4C Triton Program:
    • 3.18.18. Northrop Grumman Common Mission Management System (CMMS)
    • 3.18.19. Northrop Grumman Solution
    • 3.18.20. Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk
    • 3.18.21. Northrop Grumman Global Hawk (U.S. Air Force) RQ-4 Programs
    • 3.18.22. Northrop Grumman GHMD (U.S. Navy
    • 3.18.23. NASA Global Hawk (NASA Dryden)
    • 3.18.24. NATO AGS (U.S. and Allied Nations)
    • 3.18.25. Northrop Grumman X-47B UCAS
    • 3.18.26. Northrop Grumman Fire-X Medium-Range Vertical Unmanned Aircraft System
  • 3.19. Schiebel Camcopter S-100
    • 3.19.1. Schiebel Camcopter Target Markets:
  • 3.20. Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 $299, Flies Off a Roof
  • 3.21. Google
    • 3.21.1. Google Loon
    • 3.21.2. Google Loon Balloon Project
    • 3.21.3. Google Titan Aerospace
  • 3.22. Facebook
  • 3.23. Outernet Beamed Via Satellite
    • 3.23.1. Outernet Mobile Cloud Network Infrastructure
  • 3.24. Lockheed Martin Ground Control System
    • 3.24.1. Lockheed Martin Integrated Sensor Is Structure (ISIS)
    • 3.24.2. Lockheed Martin Integrated Sensor IS Structure (ISIS) Concept of Operations
    • 3.24.3. Lockheed Martin K-MAX Unmanned Helicopter
    • 3.24.4. Lockheed Martin K-MAX Used By Commercial Operators
    • 3.24.5. Lockheed Martin ARES
    • 3.24.6. Lockheed Martin Desert Hawk III
    • 3.24.7. Lockheed Martin Fury
    • 3.24.8. Lockheed Martin Expeditionary Ground Control System
    • 3.24.9. Lockheed Martin Remote Minehunting System
    • 3.24.10. Lockheed Martin Marlin
    • 3.24.11. Lockheed Martin Persistent Threat Detection System
    • 3.24.12. Lockheed Martin Stalker UAS Package Delivery
    • 3.24.13. Lockheed Martin Stalker Droppable Payload
  • 3.25. TRNDlabs SKEYE Nano Drone
  • 3.26. DJI Industries Phantom 3 Drone
    • 3.26.1. DJI Industries Phantom 3 Drone Live HD View
    • 3.26.2. DJI Industries Phantom 3 Drone Complete Control
    • 3.26.3. DJI Industries Phantom Intelligent Battery
    • 3.26.4. DJI Industries Inspire Drone
    • 3.26.5. DJI Industries Ronin-M
    • 3.26.6. DJI Industries Spreading Wings S1000+
    • 3.26.7. DJI Industries Zenmuse Z15-A7
  • 3.27. Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet PRS
  • 3.28. Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS
    • 3.28.1. Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS Multi-mission, Multi-role ISR System
    • 3.28.2. Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS System
    • 3.28.3. Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS Multi-mission, Multi-role ISR System Features
    • 3.28.4. Denel Dynamics Hungwe UAS
    • 3.28.5. Denel Dynamics Skua
    • 3.28.6. Denel Dynamics Skua High-speed Target Drone
  • 3.29. IAI/Malat Israel Aerospace Industries Heron
    • 3.29.1. IAI/Malat Israel Aerospace Industries Super Heron
    • 3.29.2. Israel Aerospace Industries Hunter
    • 3.29.3. Israel Aerospace Industries / RUAG Aerospace Ranger
    • 3.29.4. Israel Aerospace Industries Scout
    • 3.29.5. Israel Aerospace Industries Pioneer
    • 3.29.6. Israel Aerospace Industries Searcher MKIII
    • 3.29.7. Israel Aerospace Industries Panther Fixed Wing VTOL UAS
    • 3.29.8. Israel Aerospace Industries Mini Panther Fixed Wing VTOL Mini UAS
  • 3.30. Safran
    • 3.30.1. Safran Patroller and Sperwer
  • 3.31. Honeywell
    • 3.31.1. Honeywell Engines in General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper
  • 3.32. Prox Dynamics AS
  • 3.33. DJI
    • 3.33.1. DJI Phantom
    • 3.33.2. DJI Inspire 1
    • 3.33.3. DJI Ronin
    • 3.33.4. DJI Ronin Major Updates:

4. DRONE UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) TECHNOLOGY

  • 4.1. Learning to Fly a Hobby or Commercial Drone
    • 4.1.1. US FAA Launches Drone Safety Campaign
  • 4.2. UAS Sense and Avoid Evolution Avionics Approach
  • 4.3. Military Drone Technology
    • 4.3.1. Military Systems Interoperability
    • 4.3.2. Drone Operational Benefits Of Autonomy
  • 4.4. Northrop Grumman.BAT UAV Open Architecture
  • 4.5. Integrated Dynamics Flight Telecommand & Control Systems
    • 4.5.1. AP 2000
    • 4.5.2. AP 5000
    • 4.5.3. IFCS-6000 (Integrated Autonomous Flight Control System)
    • 4.5.4. IFCS-7000 (Integrated Autonomous Flight Control System)
    • 4.5.5. Portable Telecommand And Control System (P.T.C.S.)
  • 4.6. Improved GPS Operations
  • 4.7. Integrated Radio Guidance Transmitter (IRGX)
    • 4.7.1. Portable Telecommand And Control System (P.T.C.S.)
  • 4.8. IRGX (Integrated Radio Guidance Transmitter)
    • 4.8.1. Ground Control Stations
    • 4.8.2. GCS 1200
    • 4.8.3. GCS 2000
  • 4.9. Antenna Tracking Systems
  • 4.10. ATPS 1200
    • 4.10.1. ATPS 2000
    • 4.10.2. Gyro Stabilized Payloads
    • 4.10.3. GSP 100
    • 4.10.4. GSP 900
    • 4.10.5. GSP 1200
  • 4.11. Civilian UAV's - Rover Systemstm
  • 4.12. CPI-406 Deployable Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT)
    • 4.12.1. Deployable Flight Incident Recorder Set (DFIRS)
    • 4.12.2. Airborne Separation Video System (ASVS)
    • 4.12.3. Airborne Separation Video System - Remote Sensor (ASVS - RS)
    • 4.12.4. Airborne Tactical Server (ATS)
  • 4.13. Cloud Computing and Multilayer Security
  • 4.14. Aurora Very High-Altitude Propulsion System (VHAPS)
  • 4.15. Aurora Autonomy & Flight Control
    • 4.15.1. Aurora Guidance Sensors And Control Systems MAV Guidance
    • 4.15.2. Aurora Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Control for Air and Sea Vehicles in Littoral Operations (UAV/USV) 811
    • 4.15.3. Aurora and MIT On-board Planning System for UAVs Supporting Expeditionary Reconnaissance and Surveillance (OPS-USERS)
    • 4.15.4. Aurora Flare Planning
    • 4.15.5. Aurora Distributed Sensor Fusion
    • 4.15.6. Aurora Aerospace Electronics
    • 4.15.7. Aurora is CTC-REF
  • 4.16. Space Technologies: Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors (ACSNR)
    • 4.16.1. Rule-based Asset Management for Space Exploration Systems (RAMSES)
    • 4.16.2. Synchronized Position Hold, Engage & Reorient Experiment Satellites (SPHERES)
  • 4.17. Positive Pressure Relief Valve (PPRV)
    • 4.17.1. Chip-Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC)
    • 4.17.2. Low-Design-Impact Inspection Vehicle (LIIVe)
    • 4.17.3. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO)
    • 4.17.4. Self-Assembling Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM)
  • 4.18. Persistent, Long-Range Reconnaissance Capabilities
    • 4.18.1. United States Navy's Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) program 828
    • 4.18.2. Navy Unmanned Combat Air System UCAS Program:
    • 4.18.3. Navy Unmanned Combat Air System UCAS: Objectives:
  • 4.19. Search and Rescue (SAR)
  • 4.20. L-3 Communications LinkTEK™ IDS
  • 4.21. L-3 Communications FlightTEK® SMC
    • 4.21.1. Helicopter Main Limiting Factor Retreating Blade Stall
  • 4.22. Draganflyer X4 Applications
    • 4.22.1. Draganflyer X4 Large Project Management
    • 4.22.2. Draganflyer Remote Supervision and Investigation of Equipment
    • 4.22.3. Draganflyer Remote Supervision and Investigation of Agricultural Land and Equipment
    • 4.22.4. Draganflyer Advanced RC Flight Research
    • 4.22.5. Aerial Archeology
    • 4.22.6. Environmental Assessment
    • 4.22.7. The Draganflyer X4 is Fun to Fly
  • 4.23. Drones Protect US Commerce and US Civilian Safety
    • 4.23.1. John Adams Articulates the Need for Military to Fight Terrorists
    • 4.23.2. John Adam's Solution for Terrorism

5. DRONE AND REMOTE CONTROL COMPANY DESCRIPTION

  • 5.1. AeroVironment
    • 5.1.1. AeroVironment Financial Results For Its Third Quarter Ended January 31, 2015
  • 5.2. ASN Technologies
  • 5.3. Aurora Flight
    • 5.3.1. Aurora 2013 Employee Exceptional Service Award
  • 5.4. Aviation Industry Corp (Avic)
    • 5.4.1. Aviation Industry Corp / Thielert
  • 5.5. BAE Systems
  • 5.6. Boeing
    • 5.6.1. Boeing 2015 Revenue
    • 5.6.2. Boeing Commercial Airplanes
    • 5.6.3. Boeing Defense, Space & Security
    • 5.6.4. Boeing Capital Corporation
    • 5.6.5. Boeing Engineering, Operations & Technology
    • 5.6.6. Boeing Shared Services Group
    • 5.6.7. Boeing Revenue by Segment
    • 5.6.8. Boeing / Insitu
    • 5.6.9. Boeing Defense, Space & Security
  • 5.7. Challis UAV Inc.
  • 5.8. China Aerospace
    • 5.8.1. China Aerospace CASC Space Technology
    • 5.8.2. China Aerospace CASC Revenue
  • 5.9. Denel Dynamics
  • 5.10. DJI
  • 5.11. Draganflyer
    • 5.11.1. DraganBot
    • 5.11.2. Draganflyer ABEX Awards
  • 5.12. Finmeccanica
    • 5.12.1. DRS Technologies
  • 5.13. Flirtey
  • 5.14. General Atomics
    • 5.14.1. USAF awards Contracts to GA-ASI to convert 38 Reaper UASs to Extended Range Capability configuration 895
    • 5.14.2. U.S. Air Force Plans for Extended-Range Reaper
  • 5.15. General Dynamics
    • 5.15.1. Sequester Mechanism
    • 5.15.2. General Dynamics Revenue
    • 5.15.3. General Dynamics Robotic Systems
    • 5.15.4. General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) Vision
    • 5.15.5. General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) Manufacturing
    • 5.15.6. General Dynamics Autonomous Land And Air Vehicle Development
  • 5.16. Google
    • 5.16.1. Google Revenue
    • 5.16.2. Google Revenues by Segment and Geography
    • 5.16.3. Google / Boston Dynamics
    • 5.16.4. Boston Dynamics LS3 - Legged Squad Support Systems
    • 5.16.5. Boston Dynamics CHEETAH - Fastest Legged Robot
    • 5.16.6. Boston Dynamics Atlas - The Agile Anthropomorphic Robot
    • 5.16.7. Boston Dynamics BigDog
    • 5.16.8. Boston Dynamics LittleDog - The Legged Locomotion Learning Robot
    • 5.16.9. Google Robotic Division
    • 5.16.10. Google Self-Driving Car
    • 5.16.11. Google Cars Address Vast Majority Of Vehicle Accidents Due To Human Error
    • 5.16.12. Google Business
    • 5.16.13. Google Corporate Highlights
    • 5.16.14. Google Search
  • 5.17. GoPro
    • 5.17.1. GoPro Opular Mount
    • 5.17.2. GoPro Revenue Surges 54% As It Gains Popularity Abroad
    • 5.17.3. GoPro Acquires Kolor, A Virtual Reality Company
  • 5.18. Honeywell
    • 5.18.1. Honeywell T-Hawk Military Mini Drone
    • 5.18.2. Honeywell's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle RMUs
    • 5.18.3. Honeywell Navigation
  • 5.19. Integrated Dynamics
  • 5.20. Israel Aerospace Industries
    • 5.20.1. Israel Aerospace Industries MALAT Division
  • 5.21. L-3 Communications
    • 5.21.1. L3 Communications
    • 5.21.2. L-3 Aerospace Systems
    • 5.21.3. L-3 Electronic Systems
    • 5.21.4. L-3 Communication Systems
    • 5.21.5. L-3 National Security Solutions
    • 5.21.6. L-3 Revenue by Segment
  • 5.22. Laird / Cattron Group International
    • 5.22.1. Cattron- Theimeg Branding
  • 5.23. Laser Motive
  • 5.24. Lockheed Martin
    • 5.24.1. Lockheed Martin First Quarter 2015 Results
    • 5.24.2. Lockheed Martin Symphony Improvised Explosive Device Jammer Systems
    • 5.24.3. Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Revenue
    • 5.24.4. Lockheed Martin Electronic Systems
    • 5.24.5. Lockheed Martin
  • 5.25. Marcus UAV
  • 5.26. MMist
    • 5.26.1. MMIST Sherpatm Guided Parachute System
    • 5.26.2. MMIST SnowGoosetm CQ-10A Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)
  • 5.27. Northrop Grumman
    • 5.27.1. Northrop Grumman Revenue
    • 5.27.2. Northrop Grumman Remotec
    • 5.27.3. Northrop Grumman Leading Global Security Company
    • 5.27.4. Northrop Grumman Supplies Marine Navigation Equipment
    • 5.27.5. Northrop Grumman Recognized by UK Ministry of Defense for Role in Supporting Sentry AWACS Aircraft During Military Operations in Libya
    • 5.27.6. Northrop Grumman Corporation Subsidiary Remotec Inc. upgrade the U.S. Air Force fleet of Andros HD-1 973
    • 5.27.7. Northrop Grumman NAV CANADA Supplier
  • 5.28. Parrot/senseFly
    • 5.29.1. Parrot Group / senseFly
    • 5.29.2. Parrot Group senseFly CTI Certified
  • 5.30. Prox Dynamics
  • 5.31. Proxy Technologies
  • 5.32. RUAG Aerospace
  • 5.33. Safran Morpho
    • 5.33.1. Safron Morpho Identification Division
    • 5.33.2. Safron Morpho e-Documents Division
    • 5.33.3. Safron Morpho e-Documents Payments
    • 5.33.4. Safron Morpho e-Documents Identity & Access Management
    • 5.33.5. Safron Morpho Global Presence
    • 5.33.6. Safron Morpho Detection Division
    • 5.33.7. Safran Morpho Revenue 2015
    • 5.33.8. Key figures for the first quarter of 2015
    • 5.33.9. Safran Morpho Business highlights
    • 5.33.10. Safron Security Revenue
  • 5.34. SAIC
  • 5.35. Scaled Composites
  • 5.36. Schiebel
  • 5.37. Textron
  • 5.38. TRNDlabs
  • 5.39. Wing Looong

WINTERGREEN RESEARCH, WinterGreen Research Research Methodology

List of Tables and Figures

  • Figure ES-1: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk
  • Table ES-2: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Functions
  • Table ES-3: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Features
  • Table ES-4: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Mission Tasks
  • Table ES-5: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Benefits
  • Table ES-6: Drone UAS Challenges
  • Table ES-7: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Functions
  • Table ES-8: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Features
  • Table ES-9: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Mission Tasks
  • Table ES-10: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Benefits
  • Figure ES-11: Drone Market Shares, 2014
  • Table ES-12: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Forecasts, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 1-1: Transportation Trades AFL-CIO Endorses Federal Mandates To Require At Least Two Crew Members On U.S. Freight Trains
  • Figure 1-2: Amtrak Train Crash
  • Figure 1-3: Train Crash May 13, 2015
  • Figure 1-4: Germanwings Crash in French Alps
  • Table 1-5: Ability Of Commercial Drones UASs To Perform Delivery Function
  • Figure 1-6: Increase In Resolution That Is Possible With Georeferenced Imagery
  • Table 1-7: Department of Transportation Applications
  • Table 1-8: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Homeland Security Sites To Be Monitored
  • Figure 2-1: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk
  • Table 2-2: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Functions
  • Table 2-3: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Features
  • Table 2-4: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Mission Tasks
  • Table 2-5: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Benefits
  • Table 2-6: Drone UAS Challenges
  • Table 2-7: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Functions
  • Table 2-8: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Features
  • Table 2-9: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Mission Tasks
  • Table 2-10: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Benefits
  • Figure 2-11: Drone Market Shares, 2014
  • Figure 2-12: Drone Market Shares, 2014
  • Table 2-13: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Forecasts, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-14: Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Market Forecast Dollars and Units, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-15: Military Drone Percent Market Share, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-16: Commercial Drone Percent Market Share, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-17: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) by Sector, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Border Patrol, Disaster Response, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-18: Military Drone Regional Segment Market Forecast, US, China and India, Japan and Rest of Asia Pacific Rest of World, Dollars, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-19: Commercial Drone Regional Segment Market Forecast, US, China and India, Japan and Rest of Asia Pacific , Rest of World, Dollars, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-20: Drone Regional Segment Market Forecast, US, China and India, Japan and Rest of Asia Pacific , Rest of World, Dollars, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-21: Drone Regional Segment Market Forecast, US, China and India, Japan and Rest of Asia Pacific , Rest of World, Dollars, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-22: Military Drone Market Forecasts, Persistent, Penetrating, Tactical, Small Tactical, Mini, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-23: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk
  • Table 2-24: Military Drone Benefits
  • Table 2-25: Military Drone Removal of Need For Onboard Pilot Benefits
  • Table 2-26: Military Drones and Their Vendors
  • Table 2-27: Military Drone Market Shifts
  • Table 2-28: Military Drone Market Driving Forces
  • Figure 2-29: Military Drone Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-30: Military Drone Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-31: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk Features
  • Table 2-32: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk Functions
  • Figure 2-33: Textron Shadow
  • Figure 2-34: Boeing Insitu RQ-21A Blackjack UAV
  • Figure 2-35: Prox Dynamics AS Black Hornet Nano
  • Table 2-36: High-Altitude Surveillance Military Drones: Hawk and Reaper, Shadow and Scan Eagle, Heron
  • Table 2-37: Mini and Personal Surveillance Military Drone Vendors
  • Table 2-38: Military Drone Market Shares by Segment: Procurement, Associated Services, R&D, Spending on Operations and Maintenance, Total Market Shares, And Military Drone Portion Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-39: Military Drone Systems, Drone Dollars, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Persistent, Penetrating, Tactical, Small Tactical and Mini, Market Shares, Dollars Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-40: Military Drones and Their Vendors
  • Table 2-41: Military Persistent Drone Systems, Drone Procurement, Units, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Market Shares, Dollars and Units Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-42: Military Penetrating Drone Systems, Drone Procurement, Units, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Market Shares, Dollars and Units Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-43: Military Tactical Drone Systems, Drone Procurement, Units, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Market Shares, Units Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-44: Military Small Tactical Drone Systems, Drone Procurement, Units, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Market Shares, Units Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-45: Military Mini Drone Systems, Drone Procurement, Units, Services, R&D, Operations & Maintenance, Market Shares, Units Shipped, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-46: Military Drones: Persistent, Penetrating, Tactical, Small Tactical, Mini Market Segment Unit Analysis, 2014
  • Table 2-47: Military Drone Systems Installed and Sold by Vendor and by Type of Drone Market Shares, Units and Dollars, US, 2013 and 2014
  • Figure 2-48: Military Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Forecasts, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-49: Military Drone Market Forecasts, Persistent, Penetrating, Tactical, Small Tactical, Mini, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-50: Military Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Vehicle (UAS) Regional Market Segments, Dollars, 2014
  • Table 2-51: Military Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Regional Market Segments, 2014
  • Table 2-52: US Military Unmanned Aerial Systems Funding, RDTE, PROC, OM, Dollars and Units, Worldwide, 2014-2021
  • Table 2-53: Military Drone Benefits
  • Figure 2-54: Inventory of Unmanned Aerial Integrated Systems
  • Table 2-55: US Drone Technology Innovation
  • Figure 2-56: US Drone Systems Roadmap
  • Figure 2-57: Unfunded US Drone Designs
  • Figure 2-58: US Military Attack Drone
  • Table 2-59: US Military Technology Investment
  • Table 2-60: US Military Technology Positioning
  • Figure 2-61: US Military Drone O&M Request
  • Figure 2-62: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, 2014
  • Table 2-63: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-64: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Units and Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Figure 2-65: BP and AeroVironment Drone for Comprehensive GIS Services
  • Figure 2-66: AeroVironment Switchblade Tactical Missile System
  • Figure 2-67: Textron Shadow
  • Figure 2-68: General Atomics Predator UAS
  • Figure 2-69: General Atomics Predator B UAS
  • Table 2-70: Border Patrol / Law Enforcement Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-71: Package Delivery Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Table 2-72: Utility and Pipeline Inspection Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares
  • Figure 4-73: Draganflyer Pipeline / Hydro-Transmission Line Inspection
  • Table 2-74: Agricultural Inspection and Planting Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Figure 2-75: Yamaha Helicopter Drone Spraying
  • Figure 2-76: Yamaha RMAX Helicopter Drones
  • Table 2-77: Photography and Videography Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Shares, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014
  • Figure 2-78: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Market Forecasts Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-79: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Forecasts, Units, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-80: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Markets, Dollars, Worldwide, 2014-2021
  • Figure 2-81: Small Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Forecasts, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-82: Small Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Forecasts, Units, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-83: Mid Size Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Forecasts, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-84: Mid-Range Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Forecasts, Units, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-85: Small and Mid-Size Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Dollars and Units, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-86: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) by Sector, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Border Patrol, Disaster Response, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-87: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) by Sector, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Border Patrol, Disaster Response, Percent, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Table 2-88: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Applications, Dollars Worldwide, 2015
  • Figure 2-89: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Segments, Dollars, 2014
  • Figure 2-90: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Market Segments, Dollars, 2021
  • Figure 2-91: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) by Sector, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Border Patrol, Disaster Response, Dollars, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-92: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) by Sector, Agriculture, Oil and Gas, Border Patrol, Disaster Response, Percent, Worldwide, 2015-2021
  • Figure 2-93: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems Vehicle (UAS) Regional Market Segments, Dollars, 2014
  • Table 2-94: Commercial Drone Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Regional Market Segments, 2014
  • Figure 2-95: Military Drone Systems Installed and Sold by Vendor and by Type of Drone Market Shares, Units and Dollars, US, 2013 and 2014
  • Table 2-96: US Air Force Drone Procurement Strategy
  • Table 2-97: US Army Drone Procurement Strategy
  • Table 2-98: Illustrating US Army Drone Procurement Strategy
  • Table 2-99: US Air Force Research, Development, Test & Evaluation Strategy
  • Figure 2-100: US Navy X-47B UCLASS.
  • Table 2-101: US Drone Navy and Marines Strategies
  • Figure 2-102: US DARPA Ship Based Drone System
  • Figure 2-103: Russian S400 Triumf Anti-Aircraft System
  • Figure 3-1: Cattron Group rail Remote Control
  • Figure 3-2: Cattron Group Train Remote Controllers
  • Figure 3-3: Cattron Group Remote Control Rail Applications
  • Table 3-4: Cattron Group Railcar Movers System Features:
  • Table 3-5: Railcar Movers System Features:
  • Figure 3-6: Cattron Group Electronic Position Detection Pullback
  • Figure 3-7: Cattron Connect Virtual Inspection of Equipment
  • Figure 3-8: Boeing Airliner Remote Control Autopilot Patent
  • Figure 3-9: Boeing / Insitu Integrator System
  • Figure 3-10: Boeing / Insitu Integrator System Functions
  • Table 3-11: Boeing A160 Hummingbird Helicopter Features
  • Figure 3-12: Boeing A160 Hummingbird Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
  • Figure 3-13: Boeing Condor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
  • Table 3-14: Boeing-Insitu ScanEagle In Service Views
  • Figure 3-15: Boeing ScanEagle
  • Figure 3-16: Insitu ScanEagle
  • Figure 3-17: Boeing Insitu ScanEagle 2 - the Next Generation latform
  • Table 3-18: Insitu Industry Standards Best Practices Partners
  • Table 3-19: Insitu ICOMC2's Breakthrough Technology Capabilities
  • Table 3-20: Insitu ICOMC2 Technology Upgrade For Emergency Response
  • Figure 3-21: Insitu Integrator Sustainment Operations
  • Figure 3-22: Insitu NightEagle
  • Figure 3-23: Boeing X-37B Space Shuttle
  • Figure 3-24: AeroVironement Global Observer
  • Table 3-25: AeroVironement Global Observer Advanced Warning Factors
  • Table 3-26: AeroVironement Global Observer® System Applications
  • Table 3-27: AeroVironement Global Observer® System Target Markets
  • Figure 3-28: AeroVironement RQ-20A Puma AE
  • Figure 3-29: AeroVironement Wasp AE
  • Figure 3-30: AeroVironement Shrike VTOL
  • Figure 3-31: AeroVironement Ground Control System
  • Figure 3-32: BP and AeroVironment Drone for Comprehensive GIS Services
  • Table 3-33: AeroVironment BP Services
  • Table 3-34: AeroVironement BP Inspection of Critical Infrastructure
  • Figure 3-35: AeroVironment Commercial UAV
  • Figure 3-36: AeroVironment UAS: Raven
  • Figure 3-37: AeroVironment Raven
  • Table 3-38: Interstate Drone Regulation Functions
  • Figure 3-39: Amazon Prime Air Drone
  • Figure 3-40: Textron Shadow M2
  • Table 3-41: Textron Shadow M2 Features
  • Table 3-42: Textron One System Remote Video Terminal
  • Figure 3-43: Textron Universal Ground Control Station
  • Table 3-44: Textron Next-Generation Universal Ground Control Station (UGCS) Features And Technologies
  • Table 3-45: Textron / Aerosonde Aircraft Flight Milestones And Capabilities
  • Table 3-46: Aerosonde Service Capabilities
  • Table 3-47: Textron AAI Optimization For The Aircraft For Military Missions
  • Figure 3-48: Textron Systems AAI Shadow
  • Figure 3-49: Textron Systems AAI Shadow 600 System
  • Figure 3-50: Textron Shadow
  • Table 3-51: Textron Drone Services Positioning
  • Table 3-52: Textron Training Domains And Capabilities
  • Table 3-53: Textron Systems AAI Ground Control Stations
  • Table 3-54: Textron Systems AAI Remote Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Terminals
  • Figure 3-55: Textron Systems UAS: Wasp
  • Table 3-56: Textron Systems Global Observer System Homeland Security Functions
  • Table 3-57: Textron Systems Global Observer Features
  • Figure 3-58: Nano Air UAS Advanced Development Aircraft:
  • Figure 3-59: BAE Systems Demon Designed To Fly Without Using Flaps, Elevators, Or Ailerons
  • Figure 3-60: BAE Systems Compact Laser Range Finder
  • Figure 3-61: BAE Systems Herti Next Generation Autonomous Air System
  • Table 3-62: BAE Systems Herti Key Roles
  • Table 3-63: BAE Systems Herti Key Specifications
  • Figure 3-64: BAE Systems MANTIS
  • Table 3-65: BAE Systems Mantis Functions
  • Figure 3-66: BAE Systems MIM500™ Series Of Uncooled Infrared Camera Cores
  • Table 3-67: BAE Systems MIM500 Camera Functions
  • Figure 3-68: BAE Systems Taranis
  • Figure 3-69: BAE Systems Telemos
  • Figure 3-70: Aurora Flight Sciences Centaur OPA
  • Figure 3-71: Aurora Flight Sciences' Centaur
  • Figure 3-72: Aurora Flight Sciences Orion
  • Figure 3-73: Aurora Flight Sciences Orion Magic JCTD
  • Figure 3-74: Aurora Skate
  • Figure 3-75: Aurora Skate Flight Path
  • Figure 3-76: Aurora Skate Flying Indoors
  • Figure 3-77: Aurora's HALE
  • Figure 3-78: Aurora's Advanced Concepts: SunLight Eagle
  • Figure 3-79: Aurora Excalibur
  • Table 3-80: Aurora GoldenEye 80 Air Vehicle Planned Design Improvements
  • Figure 3-81: Aurora Flight Sciences UAS
  • Table 3-82: Aurora Flight Sciences Tactical UAVs
  • Table 3-83: Aurora's Line of Tactical UAVs
  • Table 3-84: Aurora DA42 MPP Features
  • Table 3-85: Aurora DA42 MPP Features
  • Table 3-86: Aurora DA42 MPP Target Applications
  • Figure 3-87: Aurora Flight Sciences GoldenEye 80
  • Figure 3-88: L-3 Communications Next Generation Precision Unmanned Aircraft Systems
  • Table 3-89: L3 Cutlass Launch Formats
  • Figure 3-90: L-3 Communications Cutlass
  • Table 3-91: L-3 Communications Cutlass Tube-Launched Small UAS Key Features
  • Figure 3-92: L-3 Communications Cutlass Launching From Ground And Air Tubes
  • Table 3-93: L-3 Communications Cutlass Launching Alternatives
  • Table 3-94: L-3 Communications Cutlass Functions
  • Figure 3-95: L-3 Communications Cutlass
  • Figure 3-96: L-3 Communications Mid-Tier Filling The Gap Between Tactical And Male UAS
  • Table3-97: L-3's Mid-Tier UAS Program Functions
  • Figure 3-98: L-3 Communications APEX
  • Figure 3-99: L-3 Communications Medium Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Or Manned - Mobius
  • Table 3-100: L-3 Communications Mobius Proven Airframe Features
  • Figure 3-101: L-3 Communications Mobius™
  • Table 3-102: L-3 Unmanned Systems' Viking 100 Key Features
  • Table 3-103: L-3 Unmanned Systems' Viking 300 Key Features
  • Table 3-104: L-3 Unmanned Systems' Viking 400 Key Features
  • Table 3-105: L-3 Unmanned Systems' TigerShark Key Features
  • Table 3-106: L-3 Unmanned Systems' TigerShark Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Functions
  • Table 3-107: L-3 Unmanned Systems' Communications Generation IV Ground Control Station Key Features
  • Table 3-108: L-3 Unmanned Systems Communications On-board Precision Automated Landing System Key Features
  • Table 3-109: L-3 Unmanned Systems ISR Services
  • Table 3-110: Challis Heliplane UAV E950 Features
  • Figure 3-111: Challis Heliplane
  • Figure 3-112: Challis CH-160 Heliplane Specifications
  • Figure 3-113: Challis Velocity Raptor Heliplane Specifications
  • Figure 3-114: Draganfly Handheld Ground Control System
  • Table 3-115: Draganflyer Vision Based System (VBS) Functions
  • Figure 3-116: Draganflyer Guardian
  • Figure 3-117: Draganflyer Camera
  • Figure 3-118: Draganflyer Camera Modules
  • Figure 3-119: Draganflyer Camera Operator Module
  • Figure 3-120: Draganflyer Hovering
  • Figure 3-121: Draganflyer Quad Rotor Provides Flight Stability
  • Figure 3-122: Draganflyer X6 Remotely Operated, Unmanned, Miniature Helicopter
  • Figure 3-123: Draganflyer Compact Foldable Frame
  • Figure 3-124: Draganflyer Camera Real Estate Applications
  • Figure 3-125: Draganflyer Camera Law Enforcement Applications
  • Figure 3-126: Draganflyer Camera Traffic Applications
  • Figure 3-127: Draganflyer Tactical Surveillance
  • Figure 3-128: Draganflyer X8 Helicopter
  • Figure 3-129: DraganFlyer X8 Helicopter Eight Main Horizontal Rotor Blades
  • Figure 3-130: General Atomics Predator UAS
  • Figure 3-131: General Atomics Predator B UAS
  • Table 3-132: General Atomics Predator B Multi-Mission Aircraft Features:
  • Table 3-133: General Atomics Certifiable Predator B RPA Features/Benefits:
  • Figure 3-134: General Atomics Predator C Avenger UAS
  • Figure 3-135: General Atomics Predator C Avenger UAS Features:
  • Figure 3-136: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Predator
  • Figure 3-137: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Predator Close-Up
  • Table 3-138: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Predator B
  • Figure 3-139: General Atomics Predator XP RPA
  • Table 3-140: General Atomics Predator XP Features/Benefits:
  • Figure 3-141: General Atomics Gray Eagle UAS
  • Table 3-142: General Atomics Gray Eagle UAS Features/Benefits:
  • Figure 3-143: General Atomics Gray Eagle UAS
  • Figure 3-144: General Atomics Gray Eagle UAS Features/Benefits:
  • Table 3-145: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Gray Eagle Features
  • Table 3-146: Griffin Eye Manned ISR System Claw® Sensor Control Functions
  • Figure 3-147: GA-ASI GMTI to EO/IR
  • Figure 3-148: GA-ASI Select Targets by RCS or Size
  • Figure 3-149: GA-ASI Annotation of Sensor Products
  • Figure 3-150: GA-ASI Optical Change Detection
  • Figure 3-151: GA-ASI Aided Target Classification Based On Sensor Model
  • Figure 3-152: GA-ASI Multi-Spectral Image Viewer
  • Figure 3-153: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems GA-ASI Stealthy Blue Force Tracking Device
  • Figure 3-154: Integrated Dynamics Rover
  • Figure 3-155: Integrated Dynamics Rover A View
  • Figure 3-156: Integrated Dynamics Explorer Drone
  • Figure 3-157: Integrated Dynamics Skycam
  • Figure 3-158: Integrated Dynamics Pride
  • Figure 3-159: Integrated Dynamics Spirit
  • Figure 3-160: Integrated Dynamics UAV Airframe Systems
  • Figure 3-161: Integrated Dynamics Border Eagle MK - II
  • Figure 3-162: Integrated Dynamics Hornet
  • Figure 3-163: Integrated Dynamics HAWK MK - V
  • Figure 3-164: Integrated Dynamics VISION MK I
  • Figure 3-165: Integrated Dynamics Vision M K - I I
  • Figure 3-166: Integrated Dynamics S/Integrated Dynamics Integrated Dynamics M K - I
  • Figure 3-167: Integrated Dynamics Vector
  • Figure 3-168: MMIST SnowGoose
  • Table 3-169: MMist CQ-10B advantages:
  • Table 3-170: MMist Unmanned Logistics Air Vehicle (ULAV)Functions
  • Table 3-171: MMist CQ-10 System
  • Figure 3-172: MMist SherpaTM Ranger
  • Table 3-173: MMIST Shepra Characteristics
  • Table 3-174: MMist Sherpa™ Systems Guidance Units
  • Table 3-175: MMist Sherpa™ Provider Advantages:
  • Figure 3-176: MMist Payload
  • Figure 3-177: Marcus Zephyr Airframes UAV Systems
  • Table 3-178: Marcus Zephyr Airframes UAV Systems Specifications:
  • Table 3-179: The Proxy Autonomous Control Suite (PACS™) Principal Subsystem Elements:
  • Table 3-180: Proxy SkyRaider Benefits:
  • Table 3-181: Proxy Aviation UAV capabilities
  • Figure 3-182: Chinese Jet-Powered WJ600 Chinese jet-powered WJ600
  • Figure 3-183: Chinese UAS
  • Table 3-184: Chinese V750 Helicopter Drone
  • Table 3-185: Air Show China 2010 J10 Chinese Fighter Jets
  • Figure 3-186: Northrop Grumman Bat 3 UAV
  • Table 3-187: Northrop Grumman.Bat 3 Features
  • Table 3-188: Northrop Grumman Bat 3 Specifications
  • Figure 3-189: Northrop Grumman BAT 4 UAV
  • Figure 3-190: Northrop Grumman BAT 4 UAV Features
  • Table 3-191: Northrop Grumman Bat 4 Fully Integrated With Cloud Cap Technology Piccolo II Specifications
  • Figure 3-192: Northrop Grumman V-BAT UAV
  • Table 3-193: Northrop Grumman V-BAT UAV Features
  • Table 3-194: Northrop Grumman V-BAT UAV Specifications
  • Figure 3-195: Northrop Grumman Super Bat with Piccolo II Autopilot and TASE Gimbal
  • Figure 3-196: Northrop Grumman Super Bat with Piccolo II Autopilot and TASE Gimbal Features
  • Table 3-197: Northrop Grumman MLB Super-Bat Specifications
  • Figure 3-198: Northrop Grumman Bat Unmanned Aircraft System
  • Figure 3-199: Northrop Grumman Firebird
  • Figure 3-200: Northrop Grumman M324 UAS
  • Figure 3-201: Northrop Grumman Bat Unmanned Aircraft System
  • Figure 3-202: Northrop Grumman Bat Unmanned Aircraft System
  • Table 3-203: Northrop Grumman's MQ-4C Triton Specifications
  • Figure 3-204: Northrop Grumman CMMS
  • Figure 3-205: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk (U.S. Air Force)
  • Figure 3-206: Northrop Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout
  • Table 3-207: Northrop Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout System Requirements:
  • Figure 3-208: Northrop Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout System Needs:
  • Table 3-209: Northrop Grumman Global Hawk Specifications:
  • Table 3-210: Northrop Grumman X-47B UCAS
  • Figure 3-211: Northrop Grumman Fire-X
  • Table 3-212: Schiebel Camcopter Target Markets:
  • Figure 3-213: Airborne Parrot
  • Figure 3-214: Airborne Parrot AR.Drone 2.0
  • Figure 3-215: Google Design Called A Tail Sitter, A Hybrid Of A Plane And A Helicopter
  • Figure 3-216: Project Loon Balloons Float In The Stratosphere
  • Figure 3-217: Google Loon Balloon
  • Figure 3-218: Google Titan Aerospace
  • Figure 3-219: Planet Lab CubeSats As Model for Outernet Beamed Via Satellite
  • Figure 3-220: Lockheed Martin Ground Control System
  • Table 3-221: Lockheed Martin Expeditionary Ground Control System Features
  • Figure 3-222: Lockheed Martin Integrated Sensor Is Structure (ISIS)
  • Table 3-223: Lockheed Martin Integrated Sensor Is Structure (ISIS) Capabilities
  • Table 3-224: Lockheed Martin Integrated Sensor Is Structure (ISIS) Key Features
  • Table 3-225: Lockheed Martin K-MAX Unmanned Helicopter Functions
  • Figure 3-226: Lockheed Martin K-MAX Unmanned Helicopter
  • Figure 3-227: Lockheed Martin ARES
  • Figure 3-228: Lockheed Martin Desert Hawk III
  • Figure 3-229: Lockheed Martin Fury
  • Table 3-230: Lockheed Martin Fury Features
  • Figure 3-231: Lockheed Martin Expeditionary Ground Control System
  • Table 3-232: Expeditionary Ground Control System Modules:
  • Figure 3-233: Lockheed Martin Remote Minehunting System
  • Figure 3-234: Lockheed Martin Marlin
  • Figure 3-235: Lockheed Martin Persistent Threat Detection System
  • Figure 3-236: Lockheed Martin Stalker UAS
  • Table 3-237: Lockheed Martin Stalker Droppable Payload Features
  • Table 3-238: Stalker eXtended Endurance (Stalker XE) Features
  • Figure 3-239: TRNDlabs SKEYE Nano Drone
  • Table 3-240: TRNDlabs SKEYE Nano Drone Features
  • Figure 3-241: DJI Industries Phantom 3 Drone
  • Table 3-242: DJI Industries Phantom 3 Drone Powerful Mobile App
  • Table 3-243: DJI Industries Phantom Functions
  • Table 3-244: DJI Industries Phantom SKEYE Nano Drone Open Platform Apps Programming Functions
  • Figure 3-245: DJI Industries Inspire Drone
  • Table 3-246: DJI Industries Inspire Drone Features
  • Figure 3-247: DJI Industries Ronin-M
  • Table 3-248: DJI Industries Ronin-M Functions
  • Figure 3-249: DJI Industries Spreading Wings S1000+
  • Table 3-250: DJI Industries Spreading Wings S1000+ Features
  • Figure 3-251: DJI Industries Zenmuse Z15-A7
  • Table 3-252: DJI Industries Zenmuse Z15-A7 Features
  • Figure 3-253: Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet PRS
  • Table 3-254: Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet PRS Features
  • Table 3-255: Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet Missions
  • Table 3-256: Prox Dynamics PD-100 Black Hornet Benefits
  • Figure 3-257: Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS
  • Table 3-258: Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS Features
  • Table 3-259: Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS Multi-mission, Multi-role ISR System Components:
  • Table 3-260: Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS Multi-Mission, Multi-Role ISR System Features
  • Table 3-261: Denel Dynamics Seeker 400 UAS UAS Multi-mission, Multi-role ISR System System Features
  • Figure 3-262: Denel Dynamics Hungwe UAS
  • Table 3-263: Denel Dynamics Hungwe UAS Functions
  • Figure 3-264: Denel Dynamics Skua
  • Table 3-265: Denel Dynamics Skua High-speed Target Drone Features
  • Figure 3-266: Israel Aerospace Industries Heron
  • Table 3-267: Israel Aerospace Industries Heron Features And Capabilities:
  • Figure 3-268: Israel Aerospace Industries Super Heron
  • Table 3-269: Israel Aerospace Industries Super Heron Main Features:
  • Figure 3-270: Israel Aerospace Industries Hunter
  • Table 3-271: Israel Aerospace Industries Hunter System Features And Capabilities:
  • Figure 3-272: Israel Aerospace Industries Ranger
  • Table 3-273: Israel Aerospace Industries / RUAG Ranger System Main Features And Capabilities:
  • Figure 3-274: Israel Aerospace Industries Searcher MKIII
  • Table 3-275: Israel Aerospace Industries Searcher MKIII Multiple Operational Configurations
  • Figure 3-276: Israel Aerospace Industries Panther Fixed Wing VTOL UAS
  • Table 3-277: Israel Aerospace Industries Panther Features
  • Table 3-278: Israel Aerospace Industries Panther Fixed Wing VTOL UAS Main Capabilities
  • Table 3-279: The Israel Aerospace Industries Panther Typical Missions
  • Figure 3-280: Israel Aerospace Industries Mini Panther Fixed Wing VTOL Mini UAS
  • Table 3-281: Israel Aerospace Industries Mini Panther Fixed Wing VTOL Mini UAS Features and Capabilities
  • Table 3-282: Israel Aerospace Industries Mini Panther Fixed Wing VTOL Typical Missions 3.30 Safran
  • Table 3-283: Safran Drone Positioning
  • Table 3-284: Safran Drone Missions
  • Figure 3-285: Safran Tactical Drone Systems
  • Figure 3-286: Honeywell T-Hawk Military Mini Drone
  • Figure 3-287: Honeywell Engines in General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper
  • Figure 3-288: Prox Dynamics AS Mini Protective Drone
  • Figure 3-289: DJI Phantom
  • Figure 3-290: DJI Inspire 1
  • Figure 3-291: DJI Ronin
  • Table 3-292: DJI Ronin Features
  • Figure 4-1: Typical Hobby Commercial Drone
  • Table 4-2: US FAA Suggestions for Drone Pilot Training
  • Table 4-3: Drone Standards
  • Table 4-4: Drone Certification Standards
  • Figure 4-5: UAS Automatic Surveillance Sense and Avoid Evolution
  • Figure 4-6: UAS Airspace Control LD-CAP Conceptual Architecture
  • Table 4-7: UAS Automatic Surveillance Sense LD-CAP Experimental Environment
  • Figure 4-8: UAS Sense and Avoid: See and Avoid Requirement Aspects
  • Table 4-9: UAS Avionics Approach
  • Table 4-10: Military Drone Technology Key Requirements
  • Figure 4-11: US Military DISA Drone Architecture
  • Figure 4-12: Drone Operational Architecture
  • Figure 4-13: Northrop Grumman.BAT UAV Features
  • Figure 4-14: Vehicle Tracking And Antenna Positioning System That Utilizes Unique GPS
  • Figure 4-15: Aurora Autonomy & Flight Control
  • Table 4-16: Aurora Development Capabilities
  • Table 4-17: Aurora / NASA Development Of Automated Landing Systems
  • Table 4-18: Aurora / NASA Development Automated Landing System
  • Table 4-19: Aurora / NASA Autopilot Development Issues
  • Table 4-20: Aurora / NASA Flare Planner Development
  • Table 4-21: Roles And Capabilities, Provided By Manned Platforms, With UASs by 2030
  • Figure 4-22: Size, Role, and Platform of Unmanned Aircraft
  • Table 4-23: Aircraft Prime Contractor Missions
  • Table 4-24: L-3 Communications LinkTEK Key Communication Features
  • Figure 4-25: linkTEK™ IDS
  • Table 4-26: FlightTEK Controls
  • Figure 4-27: Large Project Management
  • Figure 4-28: Draganflyer Remote Supervision and Investigation of Equipment
  • Figure 4-29: Draganflyer Pipeline / Hydro-Transmission Line Inspection
  • Figure 4-30: Draganflyer Remote Supervision and Investigation of Agricultural Fields and Crops
  • Figure 4-30: Draganflyer Advanced RC Flight Research
  • Figure 4-31: Draganflyer Remote Aerial Archeology
  • Figure 4-32: Draganflyer Remote Environmental Assessment
  • Figure 4-33: Draganflyer Fun
  • Figure 4-34: Advanced Flight Entertainment
  • Table 4-35: Draganflyer RC Helicopter Aerial Photography and Videography Platform
  • Figure 4-36: John Paul Jones US Navy Ship
  • Figure 4-37: Early US Navy Ship
  • Figure 4-38: Early US Barbary Wars Show How to Fight Terrorism
  • Table 5-1: ASnTech Mobile Or Fixed Assets Benefits
  • Table 5-2: ASnTech Mobile Or Fixed Assets Target User Markets
  • Table 5-3: ASnTech Mobile Or Fixed Assets Users
  • Table 5-4: Aurora Flight Core Values:
  • Table 5-5: BAE Systems Standards
  • Figure 5-6: BAE Systems Revenue in Defense Market
  • Table 5-7: Boeing Commercial Airplane Profile
  • Table 5-8: Boeing Commercial Airplane Installed Base Profile
  • Figure 5-9: DJI Phantom
  • Figure 5-10: Draganflyer Design
  • Figure 5-11: Draganflyer X6
  • Table 5-12: DRS Technologies Defense Technology Leading Market Positions
  • Table 5-13: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-9 Accelerated Extended Range Aircraft
  • Figure 5-14: General Atomics Reaper
  • Figure 5-15: Boston Dynamic LS3
  • Figure 5-16: Boston Dynamic CHEETAH
  • Figure 5-16: Boston Dynamic Atlas
  • Figure 5-17: Boston Dynamic BigDog
  • Figure 5-18: Boston Dynamics LittleDog
  • Table 5-19: Google Autonomous Vehicles Technology
  • Figure 5-20: GoPro Cameras
  • Figure 5-21: Honeywell T-Hawk Military Mini Drone
  • Table 5-22: Integrated Dynamics UAV/RPV Project Supply Source
  • Table 5-23: Integrated Dynamics UAV/RPV Project Accessories
  • Table 5-24: Israel Aerospace Industries IAI / Malat Main Areas Of Activity
  • Figure 5-25: Israel Aerospace Industries Malat Division
  • Table 5-26: L-3: Positioning
  • Table 5-27: Laird / Cattron Group International Customers:
  • Figure 5-28: Lockheed Martin Segment Positioning
  • Table 5-29: Lockheed Martin's operating units
  • Figure 5-30: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Segment Positioning
  • Figure 5-31: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Segment Portfolio
  • Figure 5-32: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics C130 Worldwide Airlift
  • Figure 5-33: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Falcon Fighter
  • Figure 5-34: Lockheed Martin Electronic Systems Portfolio
  • Table 5-35: Northrop Grumman Partner Of Choice
  • Figure 5-36: Northrop Grumman Systems Segments
  • Figure 5-37: Northrop Grumman Portfolio
  • Table 5-38: Proxy Technologies Deone Potential Uses
  • Figure 5-39: RUAG Aerospace Business Aviation
  • Figure 5-40: RUAG Aerospace Military Aviation
  • Table 5-41: Safran Morpho Profile
  • Table 5-42: Safron Morpho Technology Position In The Security Chain
  • Table 5-43: Safran Types of Threat Detection
  • Table 5-44: Safran Threat Detection Technologies
  • Figure 5-45: Safran Systems Deployed In The Field
  • Table 5-46: Safron Morpho Identification Division
  • Table 5-47: Safron Morpho e-Documents Divisions
  • Table 5-48: Safron Morpho Detection and Divisions
  • Table 5-49: Textron First Quarter 2015 Segment Results
  • Table 5-50: Textron Brands
  • Figure 5-51: Wing Loong Drone
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