市場調査レポート

RFID/NFCによるブランド保護:第1・2巻

RFID / NFC Meets Brand Protection: Volume I and II

発行 Vandagraf International Limited 商品コード 205717
出版日 ページ情報 英文 450 Pages; 2 Volumes
納期: 即日から翌営業日
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RFID/NFCによるブランド保護:第1・2巻 RFID / NFC Meets Brand Protection: Volume I and II
出版日: 2010年05月30日 ページ情報: 英文 450 Pages; 2 Volumes

当商品の販売は、2016年07月01日を持ちまして終了しました。

概要

当レポートでは、ブランド保護のための各種RFID/NFCソリューションについて調査分析し、製品関連犯罪のタイプ、被害額の大きいエンドユーザー産業および製品、主要エンドユーザー産業における動向と企業各社によるブランド保護戦略のケーススタディ、技術ベースの各種ソリューションと技術の詳細などをまとめ、概略以下の構成でお届けいたします。

第1巻:市場およびビジネス機会

エグゼクティブサマリー

第1章 イントロダクション

第2章 製品関連犯罪のタイプと技術ベースのソリューション

  • 製品偽造とブランド製品の違法コピー
  • 異物混入のタイプ
  • 製品関連犯罪による世界の損失額:エンドユーザー部門別内訳
  • RFID:製品保護におけるユニークな能力

第3章 偽造・違法コピー商品撲滅に利用されるブランド保護技術

  • イントロダクション
  • 製品およびパッケージングの保護:ブランド保護技術
  • ブランド保護ソリューションとしてRFIDと競合する可能性のあるブランド保護技術
  • ブランド保護におけるプリンティング&インク
  • TE(不正開栓防止)機能:ブランド保護のコンポーネント
  • 盗難防止
  • RFID

第4章 主要エンドユーザー市場の分析:ブランド保護技術としてのRFIDの適合性

  • 市場概要
  • 医薬品・ヘルスケア製品・家庭用診断キット・獣医関連製品・代替医療
  • アパレル(衣類・靴・ヘッドギア)
  • アルコール飲料:リキュール/蒸留酒・ワイン
  • 電子機器・電子部品・電池
  • 自動車用パーツ・部品・タイヤ(アフターマーケット)
  • 航空宇宙・防衛(アフターマーケット)交換部品
  • タバコ
  • 美容製品:香水・化粧品
  • 高級品:ファッションアクセサリー・ジュエリー・時計・レザー製品/カバン・サングラス
  • イメージング用消耗品
  • ゲームソフト・ハード
  • サマリー

第2巻:技術

エグゼクティブサマリー

第5章 チップベースのRFIDデバイス

  • HF帯RFIDタグ(13.56MHz)
  • UHF帯RFIDタグ(868-920MHz)
  • マイクロ波RFIDタグ(2.45GHz)
  • コンビネーションEAS-RFIDデバイス
  • SAW(Surface Acoustic Wave)RFIDデバイス(50-2500MHz)
  • LF帯RFIDタグ(125kHz-134kHz)
  • 将来の研究動向:チップベースのRFIDデバイス
  • チップベースのRFIDデバイス内のデータセキュリティ

第6章 プリンテッド"有機"RFIDデバイス

  • プリンテッドメモリー
  • フルプリンテッドパッシブRFIDデバイス
  • パッシブRFIDデバイスの製品またはパッケージングへの直接プリント
  • フルプリンテッドアクティブRFIDデバイスを利用したブランド保護
  • 将来のR&D動向:プリンテッドRFID (pRFID)

第7章 その他の競合技術:チップレス識別デバイス

  • イントロダクション
  • チップレスデバイスの開発:将来の展望

第8章 RFIDとその他のタイプのデバイスのパッケージング・ラベル・製品への組込み

  • HFおよびUHF RFIDタグ/ラベルの主な特徴
  • RFIDインレーの基板:ラベル & フィルム
  • RFIDラベルのプリンティングとオーバープリンティング
  • RFIDインレー/ラベル製造の基礎
  • オペレーション上の考察

第9章 ブランド保護アプリケーションに最適なRFIDタグタイプ/技術

  • ブランド保護アプリケーション要件
  • チップベース&チップレスRFIDのブランド保護システムの効果的な利用
  • RFIDベースシステム:従来のブランド保護技術との比較
  • 複数機能のブランド保護システム:将来の展望

付録

目次

Abstract

This report has been researched and written by Vandagraf International Limited in association with the Product & Image Security Foundation and IPI Europe Limited.

The report comprises 2 Volumes:

Volume I - Markets & Business Opportunities

  • An overview and analysis of the markets and business opportunities for RFID/NFC solutions in Brand Protection applications.
  • The types of product related crime and technology-based solutions used to combat counterfeiting and product piracy are analysed in detail. RFID technologies and non-RFID technologies are examined.
  • It contains an in-depth market sizing and scaling analysis for RFID technology in Brand Protection applications with a breakdown by selected end-user market sector together with projected growth rates.
  • End user sectors and product types causing the biggest financial losses from product related crime and those that look best suited to RFID technology in Brand Protection are identified.
  • Numerous Case studies are used to illustrate how this is already being achieved cost-effectively in real applications.
  • The report also contains the findings of an in-depth market sizing and scaling analysis for RFID technology in brand protection related applications and market opportunities with breakdown by 11 selected end-user vertical markets together with projected growth rates and forecasts to 2013:
  • Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare Products, Home Diagnostic Kits, Veterinary Products, Alternative Medication
  • Apparel (Clothing, Footwear & Headgear)
  • Alcoholic Drink Products - Liqueurs / Spirits & Wine
  • Electronic Equipment & Components, Batteries
  • Automotive Parts & Components Aftermarket (including Tyres)
  • Aerospace and Defense Aftermarket - Replacement Parts
  • Tobacco Products
  • Beauty Products - Perfumes & Colognes, Cosmetics & Make-up
  • Luxury Products - Fashion Accessories - Jewelry, Watches, Leather Products / Baggage & Sunglasses
  • Imaging Supplies
  • Games Software and Hardware.

Volume II - Technology

Volume II provides a comprehensive analysis of core RFID/NFC technologies. This includes not only conventional chip-based RFID, current and next generation chip-less tags but also printed ‘organic’ RFID devices.

The capabilities and price/performance characteristics of the various RFID devices and how they can best be applied in practice to thwart specific counterfeiting and other types of brand related threats are evaluated.

Forecasts are made about the nature and time-scale of likely future developments and their implications including the need for RFID in brand protection to be consumer activated.

Key suppliers are also profiled.

The technologies that underpin the successful deployment of RFID-based brand protection solutions are reviewed. For example, ways of protecting stored ID data in tags from cloning and other threats are analysed; as are methods of incorporating RFID devices directly into and onto products and packaging.

Strategic questions such as how best and when to prepare for the deployment of fully printed RFID devices are also addressed.

Practical help is provided to companies seeking to avoid the many pitfalls involved in selecting and implementing RFID brand protection, product authentication & e-pedigree solutions.

Note: Each Volume may be purchased individually.

Believed to be a first - A Report focusing exclusively on the dynamics of how and why the fields of RFID and Brand Protection are converging and the emerging importance of RFID and Near Field Communication (NFC) technology as a brand protection tool.

Why RFID for Brand Protection? - It is already well known that RFID-based chips can provide a method of uniquely identifying a product or asset. The embedded unique electronic identifier can be used to verify that the product associated with the tag is genuine and that it has been supplied through ‘authorised’ and legitimate channels: a so-called ‘e-pedigree’.

Track, trace and ‘authenticate’ - An Important emerging trend has been Identified

The concept of being able to trace products (track & trace) is only a part of what RFID can do in terms of brand protection - RFID technology can also positively identify and authenticate.

So where we had the term:

  • ‘track & trace’

increasingly we are seeing the term:

  • ‘track, trace and authenticate’.

This trend, we at Vandagraf believe, will become a significant force over the next few years. This is good news for RFID, a technology than can be re-designed and adapted to incorporate and provide the additional ‘authentication’ functionality.

RFID is already well established as a sophisticated and powerful tool for ‘track & trace’ applications, albeit not generally seen as a low cost solution.

There are potential applications of RFID for authentications in:

  • Existing ‘track & trace’ RFID based applications - The existing RFID tags simply need to be replaced with upgraded RFID which also incorporate the additional ‘authenticate’ capability
  • New ‘track & trace’ applications, where previously the business case has not prevailed, in some cases the additional ‘authenticate’ feature can tip the scales so that such a deployment may now be considered viable and cost effective, given the brand protection benefits weighed against the incremental cost.

End user enabled product authentication via mobile phones

The chance for a Quantum Leap forward for Brand Protection. Up until now an inherent weakness of brand protection technologies in general has been that it has not been possible to offer a facility enabling end-users to self-authenticate products that they are about to acquire or have already purchased.

Now end user enabled product authentication via NFC enabled mobile phones is seen as having the potential to revolutionise product authentication at user level. A huge number of people in the World have a mobile phone today and the number is still growing. So there it is - End user enabled product authentication via NFC enabled mobile phones.

Two technologies offer the potential to provide end user enabled product authentication via mobile phones:

  • RFID tags - NFC enabled mobile phones can read the tag
  • 2D / Matrix Digital Code - The mobile phone camera can be used to read the 2D / Matrix Digital Code.

This is viewed by many as the ‘holy grail’ of brand protection when a consumer is able to authenticate a product at the point of purchase or elsewhere.

RFID tags that cannot be cloned - Going a step further in Brand Protection

There is a clear need to prevent the re-use of genuine RFID tags / labels on unauthorised or counterfeit items.

Brand owners want to ensure that every RFID tag / label that they attach to a product can be destroyed as there is a risk that it could be removed and re-affixed to another (counterfeit) item.

What is needed for brand protection applications is a cost effective RFID tag that cannot be cloned and that can be read by end users to check its provenance.

The value of an RFID tag that cannot be cloned is completely negated if counterfeiters can simply transfer a genuine RFID tag from an authorised usage to packaging containing counterfeit (or even post sell-by-date genuine) product.

There are several approaches to eliminate the risk and to secure RFID tags / labels from this type of attack.

  • One method is to fabricate the RFID inlay / tag / label in such a way so that the tags ability to communicate after removal is automatically destroyed by the act or removal. Typically the antennae and tag become separated when the RFID label is detached from the product. Methods of glue application and antennae manufacture can achieve this effectively
  • Another method is that a ‘kill’ command is sent to the tag after it completes its last required function (for example: At retail point-of-sale). There is inherent risk in this approach since the brand owner may not have complete 100% control over this process and even the occasional dead tag on a product still passing through the supply chain prior to its last required function may well not be acceptable.

Financial losses due to counterfeiting and other forms of product related crime amounted to an estimated $698 billion in 2008. The total market for brand protection technologies was estimated at $4,633 millions in 2008, of which solutions against counterfeiting and piracy accounted for some $2,206 millions (the rest being tamper evidence and anti-theft type technologies).

The market for brand protection solutions to combat counterfeiting and product piracy are showing double digit annual growth, while solutions to combat tampering and retail theft are showing more modest growth.

From the research for this report it is concluded that major potential benefits exist with niche opportunities for RFID in Brand Protection applications.

Report Statistics

  • Publication Date: May 2010
  • Authors: James Bevan, Jeremy Plimmer and Brian Weeks
  • Total Number of Pages: Volume I - 281 pages; Volume II - 187 pages;

Table of Contents

Volume I - Markets & Business Opportunities

About this Report

  • Volume I - Markets & Business Opportunities: An Overview
  • Volume II - Technology: An Overview

Executive Summary

  • Definitions - What Qualifies as Brand Protection?
  • Why RFID for Brand Protection?
  • Why Brand Protection looks to be an interesting application area for RFID Technology:
  • Desirable Characteristics of the Ideal RFID Solution for Brand Protection:
  • Background
  • Now Rapid Changes are Transforming the Technology Landscape
  • Multi-functionality - A Key Factor in Mitigating relatively high cost of RFID
  • Primary competitive Technology to RFID in Brand Protection - Printed 2D / Matrix Digital Codes
  • Anti-Collision / Singulation - A Distinctive Strength of RFID Technology
  • End user enabled product authentication via mobile phones - The chance for a Quantum Leap forward for Brand Protection
  • Is the Mobile phone handset the Tool to enable End-users / consumers to authenticate product directly?
  • Some limitations in the Mobile Phone Concept:
  • RFID tags that cannot be cloned - Going a step further in Brand Protection
  • Track, trace and ‘authenticate’ - An Important Emerging Trend has been Identified
  • RFID Operating Frequency Bands and Read Range Requirements for Brand Protection
  • The World Market for Brand Protection Solutions
  • Forecast Annual Growth Rates for Leading Security Technologies
  • Driving Forces behind product related crime
  • Evolution of Unit Costs - RFID Tags / Labels

1. Introduction

  • 1.1. Scope of the Report
  • 1.2. Driving Forces behind product related crime
  • 1.3. Definition - What qualifies as brand protection
  • 1.4. Significant Opportunities for RFID in Brand Protection are now emerging
  • 1.5. Why RFID for Brand Protection?
  • 1.6. How RFID can assist in the process of product authentication?
  • 1.7. Track, trace and ‘authenticate’ - An important emerging trend has been identified
  • 1.8. Multi-functionality - RFID tags
  • 1.9. The emerging role of RFID in the brand protection field

2. Types of Product Related Crime and Technology-Based Solutions

  • 2.1. Types of Product Counterfeiting and Piracy of Branded Products
    • 2.1.1. Identification of High Risk Product Categories - Attractive targets for Counterfeiters / Threats for Brand Owners (Pricing / Tax / Volumes Issues)
    • 2.1.2. Product Counterfeiting and Piracy - Forgery/Alteration Fraud
    • 2.1.3. Product Counterfeiting and Piracy - Parallel Trading, Grey Markets and Diversion
    • 2.1.4. Product Counterfeiting and Piracy - Unauthorised Distribution, Back Door Trading and Over-runs
    • 2.1.5. Product Counterfeiting and Piracy - Copy and Look-alike Products
    • 2.1.6. Product Counterfeiting and Piracy - Dilution, Substitution and Refilling
    • 2.1.7. Retail and Supply Chain Theft
    • 2.1.8. Returns Fraud
  • 2.2. Types of Tampering
    • 2.2.1. Grazing (i.e.: Sampling of Products in Store without Purchasing)
    • 2.2.2. Tampering for the Purpose of Obtaining Fraudulent Cash Refunds
    • 2.2.3. Pilfering i.e. Removal of a product (or partial product) from its Container (Products are vulnerable at all stages in the entire Supply Chain)
    • 2.2.4. Malicious Criminal Tampering (Poisoning or Spiking of Products, often accompanied by Extortion Demands)
  • 2.3. Global Financial Losses due to Product Related Crime - Breakdown by end-user sectors
  • 2.4. RFID has unique capability in product protection

3. Brand Protection Technologies used to combat Counterfeiting and Product Piracy

  • 3.1. Introduction
    • 3.1.1. Geographical Aspects
    • 3.1.2. Brand Owner Aspects
  • 3.2. Protect the product as well as the packaging - Brand Protection Technologies
    • 3.2.1. A layered approach to authentication
    • 3.2.2. Levels of Defense
    • 3.2.3. Driving Forces behind product related crime
  • 3.3. Brand Protection Technologies that potentially compete with RFID as Brand Protection Solutions
    • 3.3.1. High density 3D / Matrix bar codes and other coding technologies - including mass serialisation and surface feature authentication
    • 3.3.2. Security Holographic Devices including Holographic Threads (OVIDS / DOVIDS)
    • 3.3.3. Tags & Taggants (Chemical and Molecular Coding), Nanotechnologies
    • 3.3.4. Security Materials / Substrates - Papers / Security Polarising Films / Hidden Image Technology / Digital Watermarking
  • 3.4. Printing & Inks in Brand Protection
    • 3.4.1. Security Printing Inks & Coatings - Optically variable Inks (OVI' s), Thermochromic Inks, Rub Reactive Inks, Coin Reactive Inks, Ultra Violet Inks, Laser activated colour change inks, Self Authenticating Inks, Photochromic Inks
    • 3.4.2. The move to ‘digital’ print
    • 3.3.3. Security Printing in Brand Protection - Product Development and Chain of Custody Requirements
  • 3.5. Tamper Evidence - A component of Brand Protection
    • 3.5.1. Tamper Evident Caps, tear tapes, blister seals and closures
    • 3.5.2. Tamper Evident Labels
    • 3.5.3. Other forms of Tamper Evident Packaging
    • 3.5.4. How RFID can assist in ‘raising the security barrier’ for tamper evident packaging - Physical Removal / Digital Attacks
    • 3.5.5. Privacy - Built in destruction feature allows consumers to deactivate RFID tags once a tagged product has been purchased
  • 3.6. Theft Deterrence
    • 3.6.1. Anti-theft EAS tags and systems
    • 3.6.2. Source Tagging - Anti-theft EAS tags
    • 3.6.3. Global Theft Costs Retailers and Consumers US$104 Billion Annually
    • 3.6.4. Global Costs of Retail Crime - Market Sizing
    • 3.6.5. Theft - Who' s to Blame?
    • 3.6.6. Theft - Most Vulnerable Merchandise
    • 3.6.7. Loss Prevention and Impact of EAS Technology
  • 3.7. RFID
    • 3.7.1. Types of RFID explained (Chip-based RFID Solutions, Printed Organic RFID Solutions, 1st Generation Chip-less Identification Solutions) - Applications
    • 3.7.2. The three classifications of RFID, proximity (up to 20cm), Vicinity (20cm to 1m) and extended range which allows tag to reader communications of up to and beyond 10 metres.
    • 3.7.3. Types of RFID
    • 3.7.4. The potential role of RFID in Brand Protection - the ‘click and authenticate’ approach
    • 3.7.5. Nokia - Further developments in NFC
    • 3.7.6. Going a step further in Brand Protection - Preventing the re-use of genuine RFID tags / labels on unauthorised or counterfeit items
    • 3.7.7. Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) as an integrated function in an RFID Tag in Brand Protection Applications - An Important Product Differentiator
    • 3.7.8. Anti-Collision / Singulation Capabilities - Essential in some Brand Protection Markets
    • 3.7.9. Retrofitting RFID Solutions for Brand Protection
    • 3.7.10. A scenario for the consideration of RFID tag and label suppliers as a method of delivering a better authentication system than exists at present
    • 3.7.11. Comparison of the attributes of RFID when weighed against competitive automated customer or inspection based authentication systems utilising auto-identification technologies linked to a database
    • 3.7.12. Analysis of ‘track & trace’ products use in authentication and identification

4. Analysis of Selected End User Markets - Based on Applicability of RFID as a Brand Protection Technology

  • 4.1. Overview of Markets
    • 4.1.1. Financial Losses due to Product Related Crime
    • 4.1.2. The Market for Product Related Security Solutions
    • 4.1.3. Forecast Evolution of Product Related Crime & Brand Protection Solutions
    • 4.1.4. Breakdown of the Market by Type of Brand Protection Solution
    • 4.1.5. Forecast Annual Growth Rates for Leading Security Technologies
    • 4.1.6. Shares of Gross Spending on Security Technologies - Breakdown by End User Sector
    • 4.1.7. Forecast Annual Growth Rates for Brand Protection / Product Security Solutions - Breakdown by End User Sector
    • 4.1.8. Estimated Usage of RFID Tags in 2008
    • 4.1.9. Breakdown of the RFID market by Passive / Active Tags, Readers, Networking Software
    • 4.1.10. Evolution of Unit Costs - RFID Tags / Labels
    • 4.1.11. Comparative costs per item protected between RFID and other brand protection solutions
  • 4.2. Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare Products, Home Diagnostic Kits, Veterinary Products, Alternative Medication
    • 4.2.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.2.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.2.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.2.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc.
      • Case Study Purdue Pharma / OxyContin - Item Level UHF RFID Labelling
      • Case Study Pfizer / Viagra - HF RFID Labelling at Item Level
      • Case Study Compliers Group, NL - An innovative Brand Protection
      • Solutions - RFID enabled Blister Packs - Can be linked by mobile phone to centralised database for monitoring and to initiate prompts
      • Case Study Unique sequential Dot Matrix codes for remote end-user enabled product authentication by mobile phone
  • 4.3. Apparel (Clothing, Footwear & Headgear)
    • 4.3.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.3.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.3.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.3.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Gerry Weber - Item Level RFID Labels
      • Case Study American Apparel rolls out Item Level RFID to additional Stores
      • Case Study Serge Blanco - Item Level RFID Labels
      • Case Study Rica Lewis Jeans - Item level RFID Labels
      • Case Study Marks & Spencer - The world' s biggest Item Level retailing usage of RFID
      • Case Study Hush Puppies Footwear - RFID implementation
  • 4.4. Alcoholic Drink Products - Liqueurs / Spirits & Wine
    • 4.4.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.4.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.4.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.4.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Nokia / Bols - NFC trials reveal application for RFID in liquor bottle
      • Case Study eProvenance System to Protect Fine Wines
      • Case Study InkSure and eProvenance have formed a Technology Alliance to protect the Winemarket
      • Case Study Smartcorq™ - RFID enabled fine winefine fine wine cork provides information about a fine winefine fine wine' s background (Time / Temperature profile)
      • Case Study Sea Smoke Winery - RFID Tagged Barrels
  • 4.5. Electronic Equipment & Components, Batteries
    • 4.5.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.5.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.5.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.5.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Siemens Enterprise Communications Manufacturing & Phones
      • Case Study Intel & RFID
      • Case Study RFID chips mounted on PCBs / PCAs - A Solution from Silica / Avnet Inc. that improves visibility in manufacturing and can also provide enhanced brand protection
      • Market Overview - Mobile Phones & Smart Phones
  • 4.6. Automotive Parts & Components Aftermarket (including Tyres)
    • 4.6.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.6.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.6.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.6.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Groupe Michelin detected Asian replicas of Michelin tyres in the European market and has taken legal action
      • Case Study Russian tyre maker Amtel-Vredestein N.V. discovered counterfeit, Chinese-made Amtel-brand tyres
      • Case Study Continental AG - Leading German Tyre Maker
      • Case Study Groupe Michelin RFID Tyre Identification Technology
      • Case Study Goodyear implements RFID-enabled tyre-leasing program for NASCAR
  • 4.7. Aerospace and Defense Aftermarket - Replacement Parts
    • 4.7.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.7.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.7.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.7.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Counterfeit Bearings for Aircraft
      • Case Study Airbus - RFID Tagging of Aircraft Parts in 2010
      • Case Study Axway Inc. / Sopra - New product ‘Synchrony for Aviation’ aimed at helping the aviation industry guard against counterfeit parts
  • 4.8. Tobacco Products
    • 4.8.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.8.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.8.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.8.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Fighting fakes in China - The World' s largest source of counterfeit cigarettes
      • Case Study Illegal subterranean manufacturing operations of counterfeit cigarettes in China
  • 4.9. Beauty Products - Perfumes & Colognes, Cosmetics & Make-up
    • 4.9.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.9.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.9.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.9.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Authentication of Victorinox Swiss Army Fragrance (VSAF)
  • 4.10. Luxury Products - Fashion Accessories - Jewelry, Watches, Leather Products / Baggage & Sunglasses
    • 4.10.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.10.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.10.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.10.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study de Grisogono - An RFID based Jewelry Inventory Solution from Tagsys RFID
      • Case Study An RFID solution for Jewelry Protection - HID Global / Sokymat partners with Dubai Jewelry Store
      • Case Study Authentication of Hublot Watches
      • Case Study Alpvision System for Brand Protection of Watches - Competition for RFID in Brand Protection
  • 4.11. Imaging Supplies
    • 4.11.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.11.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.11.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.11.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Hewlett Packard (HP) involvement with RFID
      • Solution Paper TBS (Total Brand Security) - T blue S Technology - Fully integrated Brand Solutions for Imaging Supplies (Printer Cartridges)
  • 4.12. Games Software and Hardware
    • 4.12.1. Market Overview (Market Sizing and Growth rates, Industry Structure, Leading Players & the Value Chain)
    • 4.12.2. Product Related Crime
    • 4.12.3. Brand Protection
    • 4.12.4. Opportunities for RFID as a Brand Protection Solution
      • Case Study Counterfeit Games Consoles seized in raid in the United Kingdom
      • Case Study Sony X-Box Game Media - Microsoft' s New Multi-colour Bar Code Technology for Identifying Audiovisual Works
  • 4.13. Summary of End User Market Sectors which could offer Potential Opportunities for Suppliers of Brand Protection Solutions (both RFID and non-RFID)

ABOUT VANDAGRAF INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

AUTHOR PROFILES

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Volume II - Technology

About this Report

  • Volume I - Markets & Business Opportunities: An Overview
  • Volume II - Technology: An Overview

Executive Summary

  • Definitions - What Qualifies as Brand Protection?
  • Why RFID for Brand Protection?
  • Why Brand Protection looks to be an interesting application area for RFID Technology:
  • Desirable Characteristics of the Ideal RFID Solution for Brand Protection:
  • Background
  • Now Rapid Changes are Transforming the Technology Landscape
  • Multi-functionality - A Key Factor in Mitigating relatively high cost of RFID
  • Primary competitive Technology to RFID in Brand Protection - Printed 2D / Matrix Digital Codes
  • Anti-Collision / Singulation - A Distinctive Strength of RFID Technology
  • End user enabled product authentication via mobile phones - The chance for a Quantum Leap forward for Brand Protection
  • Is the Mobile phone handset the Tool to enable End-users / consumers to authenticate product directly?
  • Some limitations in the Mobile Phone Concept:
  • RFID tags that cannot be cloned - Going a step further in Brand Protection
  • Track, trace and ‘authenticate’ - An Important Emerging Trend has been Identified
  • RFID Operating Frequency Bands and Read Range Requirements for Brand Protection
  • The World Market for Brand Protection Solutions
  • Forecast Annual Growth Rates for Leading Security Technologies
  • Driving Forces behind product related crime
  • Evolution of Unit Costs - RFID Tags / Labels

5. Chip-based RFID Devices

  • 5.1. High Frequency (HF) RFID Tags (13.56MHz)
    • 5.1.1. Near Field Communication (NFC) Chip-based RFID Tags
      • 5.1.1.1. Type 1 NFC Tags
      • 5.1.1.2. Type 2 NFC Tags
      • 5.1.1.3. Type 3 NFC Tags
      • 5.1.1.4. Type 4 NFC Tags
      • 5.1.1.5. Label Converters
    • 5.1.2. Brand Protection Systems based on NFC enabled Mobile Phones
      • 5.1.2.1. NFC-enabled Mobile Phones (Nokia, INSIDE Contactless, Moversa, Twinlinx)
      • 5.1.2.2. Suppliers of NFC-enabled Brand Protection Solutions (Gentag, Karl Knauer, Total Brand Security, Original1, Authix)
    • 5.1.3. Secure Brand Protection Systems based on HF RFID Tag
      • 5.1.3.1. Atmel - CryptoRF Range
      • 5.1.3.2. RFIDsec
      • 5.1.3.3. ST Microelectronics
      • 5.1.3.4. TI
      • 5.1.3.5. Infineon
      • 5.1.3.6. EM Microelectronic
      • 5.1.3.7. NXP
      • 5.1.3.8. Magellan
      • 5.1.3.9. Siemens KryptoRF®
      • 5.1.3.10. Veratag
      • 5.1.3.11. Verayo
      • 5.1.3.12. Others (WISeKey, Mikoh)
    • 5.1.4. Verification Chip-based RFID Tags
      • 5.1.4.1. Friendly Technologies
    • 5.1.5. Printed Antenna for HF RFID Devices (Leonhard KURZ, Parelec, ASK, NanoMas Technologies, Hanita Coatings, Stork Prints)
  • 5.2. Ultra High Frequency (UHF) RFID Tags (868 -920MHz)
    • 5.2.1. Far Field UHF RFID Tags
    • 5.2.2. Secure & Unclonable UHF Chip-based RFID Tags
      • 5.2.2.1. Alien Technology
      • 5.2.2.2. SecureRF
      • 5.2.2.3. Others (NXP, Impinj)
    • 5.2.3. The Hibiki Project
    • 5.2.4. Near & Far Field UHF RFID Tags
      • 5.2.4.1. Polychem
      • 5.2.4.2. Impinj
      • 5.2.4.3. Sirit
    • 5.2.5. Printed Antenna for UHF RFID Devices
      • 5.2.5.1. Additive Process Technologies - Focused Field Deposition (FFD)
      • 5.2.5.2. Conductive Inkjet Technologies - CIT
      • 5.2.5.3. Meco
      • 5.2.5.4 Others (PolyIC, Hanita Coatings, Hueck Folien, RCD Technologies)
  • 5.3. Microwave RFID Tags (2.45GHz)
    • 5.3.1. Hitachi “μ-chip” (or mu-chip)
      • 5.3.1.1. Airgate Technologies
      • 5.3.1.2. RFID Crystalgram, Japan
    • 5.3.2. HP Memory Spot
  • 5.4. Combination EAS- RFID Devices
    • 5.4.1. Accordus/Resolution Team
  • 5.5. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) RFID Devices (50 - 2500MHz)
  • 5.6. Low Frequency RFID Tags (125kHz- 134kHz)
  • 5.7. Future Research Trends: Chip-based RFID Devices
    • 5.7.1. RFID Tags Combined with Overt Security Features
    • 5.7.2. Low Cost Integration of RFID Tags into Packaging & Products
    • 5.7.3. Improving the Cost/Performance Envelope of RFID Tags (Kovio, NanoMas Technologies, DAG System, Cambridge Resonant Technologies, Magellan PJM)
    • 5.7.4. Multi-Functional RFID Devices
    • 5.7.5. Secure Databases & Integrated Communication
    • 5.7.6. Restricting Sensitive Data on the RFID Tag
  • 5.8. Security of Data Stored on Chip-based RFID Devices
    • 5.8.1. The Main Types of Security Threats
      • 5.8.1.1. RFID Viruses & Security Threats
    • 5.8.2. Methods of Securing & Protecting RFID Tags
      • 5.8.2.1. Tag Access Controls
      • 5.8.2.2. Anti-Cloning Techniques
      • 5.8.2.3. Detecting Alteration, Insertion & Deletion
      • 5.8.2.4. Countering Eavesdropping
      • 5.8.2.5. ‘Lite’ Hardware Designs
      • 5.8.2.6. Physical Means of Protection
      • 5.8.2.7. Other Methods of Ensuring Data is Secure on Chipbased RFID Tags
    • 5.8.3. RFID Security Alliance
    • 5.8.4. Secure Authentication Systems
      • 5.8.4.1. First Ondemand
      • 5.8.4.2. Neocatena Networks

6. Printed ‘Organic’ RFID Devices

  • 6.1. Printed Memory
    • 6.1.1. Thin Film Electronics
    • 6.1.2 Menippos
  • 6.2. Fully Printed Passive RFID Devices
    • 6.2.1. Ink Stripes
      • 6.2.1.1. Acreo
      • 6.2.1.2. Panipol
    • 6.2.2. Printed Radar Arrays
      • 6.2.2.1. Inksure Technologies
      • 6.2.2.2. Somark Innovations
      • 6.2.2.3. VubiQ
    • 6.2.3. Organic Thin Film Transistor Circuits (OTFTCs)
      • 6.2.3.1. PolyIC
      • 6.2.3.2. Siemens
      • 6.2.3.3. Kovio
      • 6.2.3.4. OrganicID/Weyerhauser
      • 6.2.3.5. Others (3M, NanoGram, Nano ePrint, Plastic Logic, Printed Systems GmbH, Xerox)
  • 6.3. Printing Complete Passive RFID Devices Directly onto Products or Packaging
  • 6.4. Brand Protection using Fully Printed Active RFID Devices
    • 6.4.1. The Compliers Group
    • 6.4.2. NTERA
    • 6.4.3 Others (Cypak, Monohakobi)
  • 6.5. Future Developments & Research Trends - Printed RFID (pRFID)
    • 6.5.1. Passive RFID Display Cards (Bundesdruckerei, Oberthur Technologies, GS1 Technologies, Giesecke & Devrient)
    • 6.5.2. The PRISMA (Printed Smart RFID Labels Consortium)
    • 6.5.3. PARIFLEX Consortium
    • 6.5.4. CONTACT

7. Other Competing Technologies - Chip-less Identification Devices

  • 7.1. Introduction
    • 7.1.1. Electromagnetic, Inductive & Capacitor Array Chip-less Identification Devices
    • 7.1.2. Chip-less RFID Technologies
      • 7.1.2.1. Performance comparisons - Chip-less RFID Technologies
      • 7.1.2.2. Flying Null
      • 7.1.2.3. ACS - Advanced Coding Systems
      • 7.1.2.4. Inkode
      • 7.1.2.5. Quantum Dots
  • 7.2. Future Prospects for the Development of Chip-less Devices
    • 7.2.1. Molecular Computational Identification (MCID) Devices
    • 7.2.2. Oxonica (Sol-ID)
      • 7.2.2.1. Background: Raman Scattering, SERS and Fluorescence
    • 7.2.3. Surface Feature Authentication (SFA)
    • 7.2.4. TruTag
    • 7.2.5. Other Silicon Chip-less Technologies that can be read from a distance
      • 7.2.5.1. Nicanti
      • 7.2.5.2. Authix
      • 7.2.5.3. SingularID
      • 7.2.5.4. Terahertz Tagging

8. Incorporating RFID & Other Types of Device into Packaging, Labels & Products

  • 8.1. Main Characteristics of HF Versus UHF RFID Tags / Labels
  • 8.2. Substrates for RFID Inlays - Labels & Film
    • 8.2.1. Low-cost RFID Smart Labels - 13.56 MHz
    • 8.2.2. Product Offerings - Components Versus Finished Labels
    • 8.2.3. RFID Label Types & Form Factors
    • 8.2.4. Prime Item Level RFID labels
    • 8.2.5. RFID Enabled Hang-Tags / Swing Tickets
    • 8.2.6. Tubular Woven Labels
  • 8.3. RFID Label Printing and Over-printing
    • 8.3.1. Background to RFID Label Printing
    • 8.3.2. Process Options
    • 8.3.3. Applying finished RFID labels to products
    • 8.3.4. Incorporating RFID Labels & Inlays into Corrugated Materials
  • 8.4. The Basics of RFID Inlay / Label Manufacture
    • 8.4.1. Low-Cost RFID UHF Inlay Construction
    • 8.4.2. Strap Attachments (Fixing Silicon Chips to Antennas)
    • 8.4.3. RFID Label Laminate Construction - Triple layer & Dual layer
    • 8.4.4. Creating an RFID Smart Labelstock
    • 8.4.5. Printed RFID Antennas
  • 8.5. Operational Considerations
    • 8.5.1. Modify tag position according to the contents of the pack
    • 8.5.2. Orientation & Position
    • 8.5.3. Read Range
    • 8.5.4. Size
    • 8.5.5. Environment

9. Selecting Optimum RFID Tag Types / Technologies for Brand Protection Applications

  • 9.1. Brand Protection Application Requirements
  • 9.2. Effective Exploitation of Chip-based & Chip-less RFID Brand Protection Systems
    • 9.2.1. Selecting Effective RFID Brand Protection Systems for Specific Markets
    • 9.2.2. Selecting Systems based on NFC-enabled Mobile Phones
  • 9.3. Benchmarking RFID based systems against Conventional Brand Protection Technologies
  • 9.4. Future Prospects for Multiple Function Brand Protection Systems

APPENDICES

  • APPENDIX 1: Glossary of Technical Terms
  • APPENDIX 2: Near Field Communication (NFC): What it is & How it Works
  • APPENDIX 3: Supplier Profiles
    • Table A.3.1. Suppliers of Chip-based RFID Devices for Brand Protection & e-Pedigree Applications
    • Table A.3.2. Suppliers of Chip-based RFID Data Management Systems for Brand Protection & e-Pedigree Applications
    • Table A.3.3. Suppliers of Inks or Printed Antennas for Chip-based & Printed Organic RFID Devices
  • APPENDIX 4: Supplier Profiles: 2nd generation Chip-less & Printed Organic RFID Devices for Brand Protection & e-Pedigree Applications
  • APPENDIX 5: Some Recent EU Funded Projects on RFID in Brand Protection & Related Applications
    • A.5.1. SustainPack
    • A.5.2. BRIDGE
    • A.5.3. StolPan: SToLPaN - Store Logistics & Payment with NFC
    • A.5.4. RACE networkRFID

ABOUT VANDAGRAF INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

AUTHOR PROFILES

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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