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市場調査レポート

組込みソフトウェア&ツール市場:産業オートメーション部門

Embedded Software & Tools Market: Industrial Automation - Vertical Markets

発行 VDC Research Group, Inc. 商品コード 260338
出版日 ページ情報 英文 61 Pages, 107 Exhibits
納期: 即日から翌営業日
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組込みソフトウェア&ツール市場:産業オートメーション部門 Embedded Software & Tools Market: Industrial Automation - Vertical Markets
出版日: 2012年12月31日 ページ情報: 英文 61 Pages, 107 Exhibits
概要

他の産業部門と同様に、産業オートメーション&コントロール(IAC)およびエネルギー/電力部門においても、よりスマートでインテリジェントな製品およびアプリケーションの普及はネットワークやインターネット、強力で先進的なハードウェア、複雑なシステムなどの統合によりもたらされます。IAC&エネルギー/電力部門向けソリューションプロバイダーにとってのTAM(total addressable market)は、組み込みデバイスのソフトウェアによって実現する機能性への依存度が増す中で大幅に拡大しています。

当レポートでは、産業オートメーション部門向けの組込みソフトウェア&ツールの市場について調査分析し、市場推計および予測、市場影響因子の分析、組込みシステムエンジニアの技術要件・好み・利用状況の調査などをまとめ、概略下記の構成でお届けいたします。

重要ポイント

  • 戦略的課題・動向・市場推進因子

ベンダーへの影響

  • ドメイン間の統合を奨励するSSLM利用
  • グリーン技術・ソフトウェアへの関心の拡大

市場概要

  • ソフトウェア:製造・ユーティリティ部門における進化の中心
  • 機能性と脆弱性を付加するコネクティビティ

市場推計・予測

  • 現在の実践状況・産業動向・標準規格
  • 複雑性の増大による商用OS&ツールの提供価値の拡大
  • ソフトウェアおよびシステムの各種ライフサイクルマネジメントツールを導入するOEM
  • 調査回答者:アプリケーションクラス別
  • アプリケーション分析
  • エンジニアの潜在的座席数
  • ソフトウェアエンジニアリング:最速成長の区分、など

エンドユーザーの需要分析

  • 現在の組込み開発プロジェクトに関して質問されるエンジニア・エンドユーザー産業別の人口動態
  • エンジニアの約30%はマルチコア/マルチプロセッシング設計での作業経験がない
  • エンジニアリング関連市場の健全性:楽観的見解
  • ツール予算:多くの回答者があまり変化がないと答える
  • 現在のプロジェクトのソフトウェア開発でもっともよく利用されるプログラミング言語
  • Windows XPからWindows 7へ移行しているユーザー
  • エネルギー/電力産業におけるセキュリティの重要性:広く認識されている
  • 40%以上は積極的なセキュリティ対策を採用していない
  • IACおよびエネルギー/電力産業におけるエンジニアリングのアウトソーシング動向
  • 遅延をもたらす様々な要素
  • IACおよびエネルギー/電力産業:比較的小規模なエンジニアリングチーム
  • シングルプロセッサー・マルチプロセッサー:マルチコアへのシフトにより縮小
  • OEM:商用ライセンスを持ったOSへの移行
  • 主要IDEを供給するMicrosoft・IAR・Keil

図表

目次

Software at the core of evolution in manufacturing and utilities

There is fundamental change occurring in the industrial automation and control (lAO) market. Manufacturers are upgrading and replacing legacy hardware with a more connected and integrated, plant-centric ecosystem. Progressively more machines are networked and connected to the internet. These changes are impacting the entire factory environment from engineering and process management to operations and planning. Companies making these changes have improved their plant efficiency by reducing power consumption, time to market, and overall costs.

Likewise, utilities are in the midst of a technology transformation as this extremely broad industry injects more information technology into all segments of their infrastructure. With consumers and governments more conscious of energy, the traditional delivery model of one-way power generation and transmission to end- users is increasingly viewed as outdated.

  • For example, utilities are investigating alternative forms of energy including wind, solar, and hydro to augment their reliance on mature petroleum-based energy sources. Embedded computing suppliers must understand inflection points of this transition to address the requirements of the growing renewable energy market such as developing systems to safely convert power from alternative sources and manage its integration with the existing utility grid.

Public pressure and regulatory mandates are driving a technology revolution to meet the demand for improved reliability, productivity, scalability and energy efficiencies in the power industry. The expanded application of high technology is providing these improvements across generation, transmission and distribution. This IT modernization vision which brings networking and automation to the energy infrastructure is widely referred to as the Smart Grid. In addition to the potential benefits, the injection of intelligence and connectivity brings with it the increased threat of security vulnerabi lities.

As witnessed in several other verticals which previously adopted these information technologies, the convergence of networking and the internet, more powerful and sophisticated hardware, and increasingly complex systems has created a proliferation of smarter, more intelligent products and applications in the IAC and energy/power markets. The total addressable market for IAC and energy/power solutions providers is expanding considerably as reliance upon software driven functionality in embedded devices spreads within these industries. OEMs desire the efficiency, security and quality control that have been enabled by modern IT technologies in other vertical markets. VDC expects software content and its corresponding hardware will continue to grow in parallel with the demand for more a more-connected factory floor and power infrastructure. Embedded vendors can best take advantage of these expanding opportunities by providing highly reliable, standard-compliant solutions targeting the specific requirements of each market.

Strategic Issues, Trends & Market Drivers

Burgeoning complexity increasing the value proposition of commercial OS and tools

Historically the industrial automation and energy/power markets have relied less on high technology than some other verticals such as mil/aero and telecommunications. However with software complexity increasing and time-to-market pressures rising, this has begun to change. Embedded developers in these markets are struggling to complete projects within expense and scheduling constraints using existing practices and tools.

Total Market for Commercial Embedded Software Spend,
by Solution Type, 2011

(VDC Modeled Estimate)

In response to these pressures, engineering organizations in lAO and energy/power are investing in more software and system lifecycle management (SSLM) tools such as modeling, automated test, requirements management, and source/change/configuration management tools. The percentage of respondents' overall software spend relating to these SSLM tools is projected to increase from 30% in 2011 to 33% in 2013.

The evolution and wider adoption of safety standards in these markets can make it more difficult and expensive to develop solutions fully in-house. The certifiable code generation functionality provided by formal modeling tools is a growing opportunity for suppliers. Software and system modeling tools experienced the largest percentage increase in terms of overall software spend over the forecast period.

The rate of technology change continues to accelerate as the quantity and complexity of tools and platforms expands. In this environment, QEMs are increasingly using commercially supplied embedded! real-time OS solutions on their devices. This shift away from developing and maintaining an in-house OS allows the organizations to focus more on their core competencies.

Over 40% of respondents have not taken any proactive security actions

The industrial automation and energy/power markets have intense safety and regulatory requirements. However, our findings reveal many organizations have not addressed security in their current development projects. Whether due to the slow-moving nature inherent to both of these industries or to OEMs unfamiliar with ways to improve device security, over half of the survey respondents indicate either no proactive actions have yet been taken or they are not aware what, if any, measures are underway to limit potential security issues.

The proliferation of intelligent embedded devices receiving, storing and/or communicating growing volumes of potentially sensitive data presents an enticing target for hackers and other criminal entities.

Widely publicized cyber attacks in the industrial and power generation sectors have broadened awareness of the impact of security breaches. Sophisticated attacks, such as the Stuxnet worm, and the increased exposure due to remote monitoring devices of smart grid networks may contribute to a greater awareness of the importance of security, particularly in the energy sector.

Industrial automation and control was one of the only verticals where less than 50% of respondents consider security to be important. But going forward, a growing interest in security technologies should translate into more frequent implementation of preventative measures and a greater role of security as a criteria in the evaluation of tools and processes in this industry.

About the Team

Chris Rommel, Vice President.

Steve Balacco, Director.

André Girard, Senior Analyst.

Table of Contents

Critical Takeaways

  • Page 4: Strategic issues, trends, and market drivers

Implications for Vendors

  • Page 6: SSLM use encouraging cross-domain integration
  • Page 7: Growing interest in green-technology and software

Market Overview

  • Page 9: Software at the core of evolution in manufacturing and utilities
  • Page 10: Connectivity adds functionality and vulnerability

Market Estimates & Forecasts

  • Page 12: Current Practices, Industry Trends & Standards
  • Page 13: Current Practices, Industry Trends & Standards
  • Page 14: Burgeoning complexity increasing the value proposition of commercial OS and tools
  • Page 15: OEMs adopting a range of software and systems lifecycle management tools
  • Page 16: Survey respondents by application class
  • Page 17: Applications analysis
  • Page 18: Applications analysis
  • Page 19: Applications analysis
  • Page 20: Applications analysis
  • Page 21: Applications analysis
  • Page 22: Potential number of engineer seats
  • Page 23: Software engineering is fastest growing segment
  • Page 24: Company staff include engineers from various disciplines hardware engineers comprise the largest number

End-User Demand Analysis

  • Page 23: Engineers questioned regarding current embedded development project, demographics of vertical population
  • Page 27: Engineers questioned regarding current embedded development project, demographics of vertical population
  • Page 28: Nearly 30% of engineers have no experience working with multicore and/or multiprocessing designs
  • Page 29: Optimistic view of the engineering job market health
  • Page 30: Many expect tool budget to remain static
  • Page 31: Programming languages most used to develop software for current projects include C, C++, Java, and Assembly
  • Page 32: Users migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
  • Page 33: Wider understanding of the importance of security in energy/power industry
  • Page 34: Over 40% have not taken any proactive security actions
  • Page 35: Engineering outsourcing trends for IAC and Energy / Power
  • Page 36: Numerous factors contribute to delays
  • Page 37: Relatively small engineering teams in IAC and Energy/Power
  • Page 38: Single and multiprocessor declining as use shifts to multicore
  • Page 39: OEMs turning to commercially licensed OS
  • Page 40: Microsoft, IAR, and Keil supplying the market leading IDEs

LIST OF EXHIBITS

Appendix

  • Exhibit 1: Survey Respondents Segmented by Country in which Currently Working
  • Exhibit 2: Survey Respondents Segmented by Geographic Sub-Region
  • Exhibit 3: Survey Respondents Segmented by Geographic Region
  • Exhibit 4: Types of Company/Organization for which Respondents Work
  • Exhibit 5: Survey Respondents Segmented by Primary Role within Company
  • Exhibit 6: Number and Types of Embedded System Engineers at Respondents Companies
  • Exhibit 7: Number of Different Embedded Engineering Projects Started by Respondents Companies in 2011
  • Exhibit 8: Number of Different Embedded Engineering Project Starts Expected by Respondents Companies in 2012
  • Exhibit 9: Survey Respondents Best Estimate of the Fully-Loaded Labor Cost (including salary, benefits, overhead, etc.) for a Typical Engineer Involved in the Engineering of Embedded Mobile Systems/Devices, Software, Hardware, Processors, and/or Processor IP Products at their Location
  • Exhibit 10: Number of Different Embedded Engineering Products Shipped by Respondents Companies in 2011
  • Exhibit 11: Number of Different Embedded Engineering Products Expect to be Shipped by Respondents Companies in 2012
  • Exhibit 12: Percentage Embedded/Mobile Devices/Systems Shipped in 2011 by OS Type
  • Exhibit 13: Survey Respondents Product Design Type
  • Exhibit 14: Type of Product Being Developed in Current Project
  • Exhibit 15: Survey Respondents Segmented by the Target Industry/application of their Current Project
  • Exhibit 16: Survey Respondents Segmented by Energy/Power
  • Exhibit 17: Survey Respondents Segmented by Industrial Automation
  • Exhibit 18: Intended Use of the Device Under Development
  • Exhibit 19: Estimate of the Total Project Length in Calendar Months (Actual Time from Initial Specification to Shipment)
  • Exhibit 20: Estimate of the Number and Types of Full-time Engineers that are Working on Respondents Current Projects
  • Exhibit 21: Estimate of the Number of Units that will Ship per Year Once the Current Product has been Designed
  • Exhibit 22: Estimate of the Total Cost of Development (Includes labor, overhead, tools licensing, etc.)
  • Exhibit 23: Estimate of the Percentage of Total Development Cost Related to Software Development
  • Exhibit 24: Estimate of the Percentage of Total Software Development Cost Related to Licensing Commercial Software
  • Exhibit 25: Estimate of the Approximate per Unit Production Cost of the Current Embedded Product Respondents are Developing
  • Exhibit 26: Estimated Costs of Components as Percentages of the per Unit Production Cost
  • Exhibit 27: Estimate of the per Unit/Device Sale Price
  • Exhibit 28: Factors of Importance in the Development of the Product
  • Exhibit 29: Engineering Tasks Outsourced to External Companies
  • Exhibit 30: Expected Change in the Amount of Outsourcing for a Typical Project at Respondents Companies
  • Exhibit 31: Project Tasks in which Respondents are Personally Involved on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 32: Percent of Respondents Time Spent in Different Tasks over the Course of the Current Project
  • Exhibit 33: Adherence to Schedule for Current Project (or Best Estimate Upon Completion)
  • Exhibit 34: Respondents Estimation of Factors Most Attributable to Projects Delay
  • Exhibit 35: Processing Unit(s) Used on Current Designs
  • Exhibit 36: Processing Unit(s) Expected to be Used in Two Years
  • Exhibit 37: Processing Architecture Used on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 38: Processing Architecture Expected to be Used in Two Years
  • Exhibit 39: Respondents Experience Working with/Programming Multicore and/or Multiprocessor Designs
  • Exhibit 40: Respondents Rating of Training Available to Engineers to Learn Multicore Programming as Offered by the Following
  • Exhibit 41: Respondents Rating of Overall Capabilities and Maturity of Commercial Software Enabling Multicore Systems/Devices
  • Exhibit 42: Total Number of ICs/processors (on separate silicon) Used in the Current Project
  • Exhibit 43: Total Number of ICs/processors (on separate silicon) Expected Next Two Years
  • Exhibit 44: Total Number of Cores (across all ICs/processors) Used in the Current Project
  • Exhibit 45: Total Number of Cores (across all ICs/processors) Expected Next Two Years
  • Exhibit 46: Multiprocessing Methodology Employed for Current Project
  • Exhibit 47: Multiprocessing Methodology for Project Expected in Two Years
  • Exhibit 48: Multiprocessing Architecture Used in the Current Project
  • Exhibit 49: Multiprocessing Architecture for Project Expected in Two Years
  • Exhibit 50: Instruction Set Architecture(s) Used within the Embedded System/device Currently Being Designed
  • Exhibit 51: Instruction Set Architecture(s) Expected Use within Embedded Systems/devices in the Next Two Years
  • Exhibit 52: Semiconductor Supplier(s) Providing the Processors Used within the Embedded System/device Currently Being Designed
  • Exhibit 53: Expected Semiconductor Supplier(s) Providing the Processors Used within the Embedded System/device in the Next Two Years
  • Exhibit 54: Processor Family(ies) of Processor(s) Used within the Embedded System/device Currently being Designed
  • Exhibit 55: Processor Family(ies) of Processor(s) Expected Use within the Embedded System/device in the Next Two Years
  • Exhibit 56: Most Important Criteria When Selecting the Processor(s) Used Within the Target Embedded System/Device on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 57: Number of Operating Systems Required by the Target Embedded Device/System on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 58: Operating System(s) Used on the Target Embedded System on the Previous Project
  • Exhibit 59: Operating System(s) Used on the Target Embedded System on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 60: Operating System(s) Expected to be Used on the Target Embedded System on the Next Project
  • Exhibit 61: Issues Making it Difficult to Switch to a Commercial Product
  • Exhibit 62: Most Useful Resources for Informing the Selection/Purchase of Embedded Software Solutions
  • Exhibit 63: Other Software Stack Components Required by Current Device/system
  • Exhibit 64: Other Software Stack Components Expected to be Required by a Similar Project in Two Years
  • Exhibit 65: Current Target OS Same Supplier/Brand as Most Recent Similar Project
  • Exhibit 66: Importance of Embedded Operating System Characteristics during OS Selection for Current Project
  • Exhibit 67: Publicly Obtained Open Source Operating System(s) Used on Target Device for Current Project
  • Exhibit 68: Commercially Licensed Operating Systems Used on Target Device for Current Project
  • Exhibit 69: Commercially Licensed or Consortia Obtained Open Source Operating System(s) Used on Target Device for Current Project
  • Exhibit 70: Respondents Organization Policy towards the Use of Open Source Software
  • Exhibit 71: Respondents Familiarity with the Concept of Virtualization for Mobile/Embedded Systems
  • Exhibit 72: Current Development Project Using Virtualization Run-time Software
  • Exhibit 73: Expected Future Development Project Use of Virtualization Run-time Software
  • Exhibit 74: Primary Advantages from the Use of Virtualization
  • Exhibit 75: Primary Disadvantages from the Use of Virtualization
  • Exhibit 76: Is Security Important for the Device/System under Development?
  • Exhibit 77: Are you using either of the following solutions for the development of your embedded software/system (Do not include their use for support of your host development platform or corporate server)?
  • Exhibit 78: Types of Security Issues that are Important
  • Exhibit 79: Current Development Project Actions Taken to Limit Potential Security Issues
  • Exhibit 80: Confidence in Meeting Security Requirement for Product Under Development
  • Exhibit 81: Respondents Company Approach to Selecting an Embedded/Mobile OS
  • Exhibit 82: Components that Respondents Company Selected First for Current Project
  • Exhibit 83: Primary Host Development Environment Used for Current Development Projects
  • Exhibit 84: Primary Host Development Environment Expected to be Used for Development Projects in Two Years
  • Exhibit 85: Other Types of Devices Considered to be a Good Fit for Android
  • Exhibit 86: Number and Types of Embedded System Engineers at Respondents Companies
  • Exhibit 87: Approximate Cost Budgeted for All of the Tools Respondents are Using on the Current Project
  • Exhibit 88: Expected Change in Respondents Tool Budgets
  • Exhibit 89: Percent Change in Respondents Tool Budgets
  • Exhibit 90: Types of Tool(s) Used for Current Project
  • Exhibit 91: Most Important Characteristics When Selecting Tools Used on Current Project
  • Exhibit 92: Respondents Use of an IDE for Current Project Development
  • Exhibit 93: IDE(s) Used for Current Project Development
  • Exhibit 94: Source of Development Tools for ARM- or MIPS-based Current Development Project
  • Exhibit 95: Number of Commercial/third Party Lines of Software Code in Final Design for Current Project
  • Exhibit 96: Number of Open Source/third-party Lines of Software Code in Final Design for Current Project
  • Exhibit 97: Number of In-house Developed Lines of Software Code in Final Design for Current Project
  • Exhibit 98: Source of In-house Developed Software Code for Current Project
  • Exhibit 99: Expected Percent Increase (or Decrease) in the Total Lines of Software Code for the Next Project
  • Exhibit 100: Language(s) Used to Develop Software for Current Project
  • Exhibit 101: Description of the Health of the Current Engineering Job Market in the Country of Respondent
  • Exhibit 102: Annual Salary of Survey Respondents

Market Estimates

  • Exhibit 1: Global Distributed/Remote I/O Shipments for Industrial Markets, 2011-2014 (Millions of Units)
  • Exhibit 2: Global Process Level Measurement Device Shipments for Industrial Markets, 2011-2014 (Thousands of Units)
  • Exhibit 3: Global Industrial Programmable Logic Controller Unit Shipments, 2011-2014 (Thousands of Units)
  • Exhibit 4: Global Industrial Operator Interface Terminal Unit Shipments, 2011-2014 (Thousands of Units)
  • Exhibit 5: Global Electrical Utility Smart Meter Unit Shipments, 2011-2014 (Millions of Units)
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