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海底通信ケーブル用海洋サービス

Marine Services for Undersea Telecom Cables

発行 Pioneer Consulting 商品コード 72119
出版日 ページ情報 英文
納期: 即日から翌営業日
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海底通信ケーブル用海洋サービス Marine Services for Undersea Telecom Cables
出版日: 2011年04月26日 ページ情報: 英文
概要

通信海洋サービスの市場は100年を超える年月をかけて成熟化し、現在の発展段階に到達しました。海洋サービスの最大のプロバイダー(GMSL、TE SubCom、Alcatel、およびFT Marineなど)は様々な事業形態を有しますが、海底ケーブルシステムの敷設および保守においては、基本的にきわめて成熟した確かな体系的サービスを提供しています。

当報告書では、海底通信ケーブル用海洋サービス市場について調査分析し、市場の概観、主要参入企業、海底ケーブル業界に影響を及ぼす現在の動向、およびこれらのサービスに対する技術的要求をまとめ、海洋サービス市場に影響を及ぼす外部市場要因を分析するとともに、ケーブル敷設需要およびケーブル敷設船需要の予測を提示するなど、概略下記の構成でお届けいたします。

第1章 エグゼクティブサマリー

  • 目的
  • サマリー

第2章 イントロダクション

  • 海洋サービスの前提条件と定義
  • 海洋サービス市場の概要(海底通信ケーブル)
  • 産業の背景
  • 設置:深海および浅海
  • 補修:深海および浅海
  • 海洋調査
  • 海洋貯蔵

第3章 深海海洋サービス:設置および補修

  • 深海作業の概要
  • 深海バリューチェーンの説明
  • 深海作業専用船体/設備
  • 主な課題と動向

第4章 浅海海洋サービス:設置および補修

  • 浅海作業の概要
  • 浅海バリューチェーンの説明
  • 浅海作業専用船体/設備
  • 主な課題と動向:浅海作業

第5章 海洋調査市場

  • 海底通信ケーブル用調査の概要
  • 保守・点検における調査市場の役割
  • 海底通信ケーブルの調査
  • 主要な調査団体
  • 主要な調査設備/資産
  • ケーブル設置のための調査研究/ルートの改善
  • ルートおよびケーブルエンジニアリング

第6章 保守の手配

第7章 海底ケーブル貯蔵

  • 世界のケーブル貯蔵所
  • 貯蔵所へのアクセス可能性
  • ユニバーサルジョイント(UJ)

第8章 市場参入企業

  • 多様な参入企業
  • システムサプライヤー
  • 海洋サービスプロバイダー

第9章 海底ケーブル敷設船需要予測

  • 新規ケーブルの予測(ルートキロメートル):2010-2015年
  • 設置用海底ケーブル敷設船の需要予測
  • 保守用海底ケーブル敷設船の需要予測

第10章 技術および開発動向

  • 耕起設備および施設
  • 噴射設備および施設
  • 接合設備および施設
  • 埋設ツールの開発
  • ルート計画における開発
  • 自動船位保持の改善:ケーブルの位置決めおよびたるみ管理の改善
  • ケーブル敷設制御システムの開発:ループおよび未対応範囲の最小化
  • タッチダウン監視:ケーブルの底位置および/または埋設の有効化
  • 敷設後点検(PLI):敷設データの有効化
  • ケーブルの認識:ケーブル認識図、漁業連絡窓口
  • 浅海保護:水平傾斜掘削、パイプ分割、ケーブル固定

第11章 結論および所見

  • 所見

付録1:世界の海底ケーブル敷設船一覧

付録2:主要な業界参入企業のプロファイル

付録3:その他業界参入企業の一覧

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目次

Report Structure and Content

This report provides a broad overview of the marine services market for undersea telecommunications cables including: key players, current trends affecting the submarine cable industry and the technical requirements for these services.

Additionally, the report takes the opportunity to evaluate the current stock and structure of marine services provision in submarine telecommunications. Based on this and the wider trends across the submarine telecommunications marketplace, this report provides analysis of external market factors affecting the marine services industry and forecasts demand for cable kilometers and cableships.

Report Summary

Submarine Telecommunications Marine Services Market

The market for telecommunications marine services has matured over a period of more than 100 years to reach its present state of development. The largest providers of marine services (such as GMSL, TE SubCom, Alcatel, and FT Marine) operate in different ways but provide essentially a profoundly mature and assured set of services for the installation and maintenance of undersea cable systems.

The market is currently supporting marine services supplied by:

  • Submarine telecommunications cable owners and operators
  • System suppliers
  • Independent marine services suppliers(including vessel operators and services suppliers).

The market is further segmented across the processes required in the telecommunications marketplace. This includes service-based activities such as feasibility and desktop study, software and charting services, survey and route engineering, marine installation (shallow and deep water), jointing technology, marine repair and maintenance, provision of equipment to marine service providers and personnel services to resource these activities.

Vessels

In this report, we have provided details of 14 survey vessels, 38 active specialist marine installation vessels, 50 inactive vessels, 20 converted (multi-use) vessels and a forecast marine maintenance vessel demand rising from 22 ships at present.

The report contains a detailed comparison of cableships containing the following criteria:

  • Zone
  • Owner
  • Operator
  • Base Port
  • Main Activity
  • Gross Tonnage
  • Cable Capacity (Tons)
  • Cable Capacity (M3)
  • Repeater Capacity
  • Plough
  • ROV
  • Other Equipment
  • Sea State
  • LOA (M)
  • Draft (M)
  • Endurance (Days)
  • Flag
  • Year Built
  • Speed Max (Knots)
  • Classification- Description
  • Classification Society
  • Operations
  • Speed Cruising (Knots)

“Marine Services for Undersea Telecom Cables” fulfils a number of requirements that the reader may have:

  • It is a user-friendly reference to market participants, their facilities and the technologies that are used in the industry;
  • It provides a well-informed analysis of market drivers and trends today and in the future
  • Using Pioneer analysts' deep knowledge of the industry, this report provides quantitative forecasts of demand for marine services

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

  • 1.1. Objective
  • 1.2. Report Summary
    • 1.2.1. Submarine Telecommunications Marine Services Market
    • 1.2.2. Vessels
    • 1.2.3. Services
    • 1.2.4. The Future

Chapter 2: Introduction

  • 2.1. Marine Service Market Assumptions and Definitions
  • 2.2. Overview of the Marine Services Market (Submarine Telecommunications Cable)
  • 2.3. Industry Background
  • 2.4. Installation-Deep and Shallow Water
  • 2.5. Repair-Deep and Shallow Water
  • 2.6. Marine Survey
  • 2.7. Cable Storage

Chapter 3: Deep Water Marine Services-Installation and Repair

  • 3.1. Deep Water Operations Overview
    • 3.1.1. Pre-Lay Grapnel Run
      • 3.1.1.1 PLGR Equipment
        • 3.1.1.1.1. Dynamometer
        • 3.1.1.1.2. Rope and Grapnel Rigging
        • 3.1.1.1.3. Vessel Speed
        • 3.1.1.1.4. Number of Passes
        • 3.1.1.1.5. Periodic Check of Grapnels
        • 3.1.1.1.6. Active Cable Crossings
        • 3.1.1.1.7. Disposal of Recovered Debris
    • 3.1.2. Route Clearance
      • 3.1.2.1 Permission and Notifications
      • 3.1.2.2 Types of Out of Service Cables
        • 3.1.2.2.1. Corridor Width
        • 3.1.2.2.2. Recovery and Repositioning Operations
    • 3.1.3. Vessel Loading
      • 3.1.3.1 Vessel Loading Planning and Coordination
      • 3.1.3.2 Load Plan
      • 3.1.3.3 Load Rates
      • 3.1.3.4 Single-Dual Load Lines
      • 3.1.3.5 Level Loading
      • 3.1.3.6 Cable Stow
      • 3.1.3.7 Down Runners and Up Runners
      • 3.1.3.8 Repeater Stowage
      • 3.1.3.9 Rigging
      • 3.1.3.10 Transporters
      • 3.1.3.11 Cable Counters
      • 3.1.3.12 Cable Path
      • 3.1.3.13 Dunnage
      • 3.1.3.14 Keystone and Plastic Sheeting
      • 3.1.3.15 Cable Handling Guidelines
      • 3.1.3.16 Spare Cable/Repeaters
      • 3.1.3.17 Impactographs
      • 3.1.3.18 Factory As-Built Information
      • 3.1.3.19 System Schematic
      • 3.1.3.20 Freighters
      • 3.1.3.21 Barges
      • 3.1.3.22 40 Foot Open Top Containers
      • 3.1.3.23 Transporting PLSE Containers
        • 3.1.3.23.1. Transits
    • 3.1.4. Installation
      • 3.1.4.1 Start of Deep Sea Lay Operations
        • 3.1.4.1.1. Direct Landings
        • 3.1.4.1.2. Recovery of Pre-laid Shore Ends
        • 3.1.4.1.3. Recovery of Deep Sea Cable Ends
    • 3.1.5. Laying Operations
      • 3.1.5.1 Cable Slack
      • 3.1.5.2 Managing Cable Slack
      • 3.1.5.3 Burial Operations
      • 3.1.5.4 End of Lay Operations
        • 3.1.5.4.1. Buoy Operations
        • 3.1.5.4.2. Streamed Ends
        • 3.1.5.4.3. Final Splices and Final Bights
      • 3.1.5.5 Post Lay Burial and Inspection (PLIB)
        • 3.1.5.5.1. Post Lay Burial (PLB)
        • 3.1.5.5.2. Post Lay Inspection (PLI)
        • 3.1.5.5.3. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs)
        • 3.1.5.5.4. Water Jetting Systems
        • 3.1.5.5.5. ROV Launch and Recovery Systems (LARS)
        • 3.1.5.5.6. Cable Tracking Devices
        • 3.1.5.5.7. Active and Passive Modes of Operation
        • 3.1.5.5.8. Sonar
        • 3.1.5.5.9. Subsurface Positioning
    • 3.1.6. Branching Units
      • 3.1.6.1 BU Terminology
      • 3.1.6.2 Determining the Sequence of Installation
      • 3.1.6.3 First Branch Leg Installation
      • 3.1.6.4 Second Branch Leg Installation
      • 3.1.6.5 Stub Tail Splicing Operation
      • 3.1.6.6 Branching Repeater Overboarding
    • 3.1.7. Cable Jointing
      • 3.1.7.1 Installation Splices
      • 3.1.7.2 Initial Splice
      • 3.1.7.3 Final Splice
      • 3.1.7.4 Repair Splices
      • 3.1.7.5 Typical Cable Joint Process
      • 3.1.7.6 Fusion Splicing
      • 3.1.7.7 Cleavers
      • 3.1.7.8 Fusion Splicing Machines
      • 3.1.7.9 The Fusion Process
    • 3.1.8. Shipboard Testing
      • 3.1.8.1 Shipboard Testing Facilities
      • 3.1.8.2 Power Feed Equipment
      • 3.1.8.3 Shipboard Power Safety
      • 3.1.8.4 Coherent Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (COTDR)
      • 3.1.8.5 Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA)
      • 3.1.8.6 Megohmmeter (Megger)
      • 3.1.8.7 Optical Power Meters
      • 3.1.8.8 Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR)
      • 3.1.8.9 Tone Generator
      • 3.1.8.10 Shipboard Tests Vessel Loading
        • 3.1.8.10.1. Daily Tests
        • 3.1.8.10.2. Assembled Shipload Testing (ASL)
        • 3.1.8.10.3. Start of Lay Testing-Beach Landing
        • 3.1.8.10.4. Start of Lay Testing-Streamed Ends
        • 3.1.8.10.5. Start of Lay Testing-Initial Splice Testing
        • 3.1.8.10.6. Main Lay Cable Testing
        • 3.1.8.10.7. Final Splice/End of Lay Testing
        • 3.1.8.10.8. Cable Jointing Testing
        • 3.1.8.10.9. Spare Wet Plant Testing Considerations and Procedures
    • 3.1.9. Cable/Pipeline Crossings
    • 3.1.10. Industry Recommendations
    • 3.1.11. Cable Routing
    • 3.1.12. Crossing Agreements
    • 3.1.13. Cable Crossings Guidelines
    • 3.1.14. Like to Like Cable Types
    • 3.1.15. Repeaters Near Cable Crossings
    • 3.1.16. Cable Bights Near Crossings
    • 3.1.17. Branching Units Near Crossings
    • 3.1.18. Burial Operations Near Crossings
    • 3.1.19. Burial Operations Near Crossings
    • 3.1.20. Parallel Cable Routing
    • 3.1.21. Narrow Passages/Shore End Approaches
    • 3.1.22. Pipeline Crossings
    • 3.1.23. Pipeline Crossing Agreements
    • 3.1.24. Cable Pipeline Separation
    • 3.1.25. Protective Sleeves
    • 3.1.26. Concrete Mattresses
    • 3.1.27. Repairs
    • 3.1.28. ROV Cut and Recovery
  • 3.2. Description of Deep Water Value Chain
    • 3.2.1. Desk Top Study
    • 3.2.2. Marine Cable Route Survey
    • 3.2.3. Cable Engineering
    • 3.2.4. Manufacturing and Integration
    • 3.2.5. Deep Sea Installation
    • 3.2.6. Documentation
    • 3.2.7. Maintenance
  • 3.3. Vessels/Equipment Specific to Deep Water Operations
    • 3.3.1. Equipment
      • 3.3.1.1 Cable Engines
      • 3.3.1.2 Cable Drum Engines
      • 3.3.1.3 Linear Cable Engines (LCEs)
      • 3.3.1.4 Cable Counters
      • 3.3.1.5 Dynamometers
      • 3.3.1.6 Navigational Equipment
      • 3.3.1.7 Dynamic Positioning (DP)
      • 3.3.1.8 Echo Sounders
    • 3.3.2. Technical Specifications
    • 3.3.3. Economics
  • 3.4. Key Issues and Trends
    • 3.4.1. Multiuse vessels
    • 3.4.2. Current Cableship Fleet
    • 3.4.3. Sea Plough Capabilities
    • 3.4.4. Cable Laying Software
    • 3.4.5. Dynamic Positioning Capabilities

Chapter 4: Shallow Water Marine Services-Installation and Repair

  • 4.1. Shallow Water Operations Overview
    • 4.1.1. Shore End Landings
      • 4.1.1.1 Planning and Logistics of Shore End Landings
      • 4.1.1.2 Types of Shore End Landings
      • 4.1.1.3 Unburied Shore End Landings
      • 4.1.1.4 Buried Shore End Landings
      • 4.1.1.5 Cable Protection Measures
      • 4.1.1.6 Beach Trenching
      • 4.1.1.7 Beach Conduits
      • 4.1.1.8 Diver Inspection
      • 4.1.1.9 Beach Restoration
      • 4.1.1.10 Interface with Terrestrial Cable Installation Operations
    • 4.1.2. Direct Landings
      • 4.1.2.1 Shore End Pull-In Methods
      • 4.1.2.2 Beach Winch
      • 4.1.2.3 Pulling Around a Quadrant
      • 4.1.2.4 Pulling around a Turnaround Sheave
      • 4.1.2.5 Deadman Anchors
      • 4.1.2.6 Pull in Operations
      • 4.1.2.7 Armor Clamp
    • 4.1.3. Pre-Laid Shore Ends (PLSE)
      • 4.1.3.1 When is a PLSE Required or Recommended?
      • 4.1.3.2 Shallow Water Restrictions
      • 4.1.3.3 Shallow Water Alter Courses
      • 4.1.3.4 Navigational Hazards
      • 4.1.3.5 Seasonal Restrictions
      • 4.1.3.6 Cost Efficiencies
      • 4.1.3.7 Deep Burial Requirements
      • 4.1.3.8 Planning and Engineering PLSEs
      • 4.1.3.9 Manufacturing and Shipping Considerations
      • 4.1.3.10 Depth of Water Considerations
      • 4.1.3.11 Cable Jointing
      • 4.1.3.12 Daytime Operations vs. 24 Hour Operations
      • 4.1.3.13 Testing
      • 4.1.3.14 Shallow Water Cable Protection
    • 4.1.4. Articulated Pipe
    • 4.1.5. Diver Jetting
      • 4.1.5.1 Airlifting
      • 4.1.5.2 Water Dredging
    • 4.1.6. Horizontal Directional Drilling
  • 4.2. Description of Shallow Water Value Chain
    • 4.2.1. Explanation of Pre-Laid Shore Ends in Respect to Shallow Water Ops
    • 4.2.2. Inspection
    • 4.2.3. Repair
  • 4.3. Vessels/Equipment Specific to Shallow Water Operations
    • 4.3.1. Vessels of Opportunity
    • 4.3.2. Equipment (Including Cable Protection Equipment)
    • 4.3.3. Technical Specifications
      • 4.3.3.1 Four Point Mooring Tug and Barge
      • 4.3.3.2 Shallow Water DP Vessels
      • 4.3.3.3 Beachable Vessels
      • 4.3.3.4 Shallow Water Burial Tools
    • 4.3.4. Role of Permitting in Vessel Selection
    • 4.3.5. Economics
  • 4.4. Key Issues and Trends-Shallow Water Operations
    • 4.4.1. Self Perform vs. Subcontracted Services
    • 4.4.2. Every Landing Has Unique Requirements
    • 4.4.3. Shallow Water Contractors

Chapter 5: Marine Survey Market

  • 5.1. Overview of Survey for Submarine Telecom Cables
  • 5.2. Survey Market Role in Maintenance and Inspection
  • 5.3. Surveys for Undersea Telecom Cable
    • 5.3.1. Desk Top Study/Cable Route Study
    • 5.3.2. Site Visits
    • 5.3.3. Inshore Survey and Beach Survey
    • 5.3.4. Offshore Survey
      • 5.3.4.1 Multibeam Echosounding (MBES) or Swath Bathymetry
      • 5.3.4.2 Sidescan Sonar (SSS)
      • 5.3.4.3 Sub-Bottom Profiling (SBP)
      • 5.3.4.4 Seabed Samples
      • 5.3.4.5 Burial Assessment Survey (BAS), CPTs
      • 5.3.4.6 In-Service Cable Crossings (Magnetometry)
      • 5.3.4.7 Branching Units (BUs) and Planned Cable Crossings
      • 5.3.4.8 Charting and Survey Reports
    • 5.3.5. Port, Harbor and Coastal Surveys
  • 5.4. Key Survey Players
    • 5.4.1. Fugro
    • 5.4.2. EGS
    • 5.4.3. Other Survey Companies and Vessels of Opportunity
  • 5.5. Key Survey Equipment/Assets
    • 5.5.1. Multibeam Echosounders (MBES), Swath Bathymetry
    • 5.5.2. Sidescan Sonar (SSS)
    • 5.5.3. Sub-Bottom Profilers (SBP)
    • 5.5.4. Magnetometers
    • 5.5.5. Seabed Sampling
    • 5.5.6. Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPTs)
    • 5.5.7. Towed Continuous E-BAS Equipment
    • 5.5.8. Ultra-Short Baseline (USBL) Acoustic Positioning
  • 5.6. Better Survey Studies/Routes for Cable Installation
  • 5.7. Route and Cable Engineering
    • 5.7.1. Route Selection
    • 5.7.2. ICPC Recommendations
    • 5.7.3. Burial Requirements
    • 5.7.4. Cable Selection
    • 5.7.5. Cable Slack Allocation
    • 5.7.6. Initial and Final Splices, Branching Units and Cable Allowances

Chapter 6: Maintenance Arrangements

  • 6.1.1. Atlantic Cable Maintenance Agreement (ACMA)
  • 6.1.2. Mediterranean Cable Maintenance Agreement (MECMA)
  • 6.1.3. E-Marine (Middle East)
  • 6.1.4. South East Asia Indian Ocean Cable Maintenance Agreement (SEAIOCMA)
  • 6.1.5. Pacific and Indian Ocean Cable Maintenance Agreement (PIOCMA)
  • 6.1.6. Asia Private Maintenance Agreement
  • 6.1.7. South Pacific Maintenance Agreement (Private)
  • 6.1.8. Atlantic Private Maintenance Arrangement
  • 6.1.9. New Developments in the Maintenance Market
  • 6.1.10. Alternatives to the Traditional Maintenance Agreement Model

Chapter 7: Submarine Cable Storage

  • 7.1. Cable Depots Around the World
    • 7.1.1. E-Marine PJSC
    • 7.1.2. TE SubCom
    • 7.1.3. S. B. Submarine Systems Co., Ltd. (SBSS)
    • 7.1.4. Kokusai Cable Ship Co., Ltd. (KCS)
      • 7.1.4.1 Cooperation
    • 7.1.5. KT Submarine (KTS)
    • 7.1.6. Global Marine Systems Limited (GMSL)
    • 7.1.7. France Telecom Marine (FT)
    • 7.1.8. Baltic Offshore
    • 7.1.9. IT International Telecom
      • 7.1.9.1 The Atlantic Facility
      • 7.1.9.2 The Pacific Facility
    • 7.1.10. Subsea Network Services Pte. Ltd. (SNS)
      • 7.1.10.1 SNS' s Cable Protector
      • 7.1.10.2 SNS' s Sembawang Cable Depot Pte. Ltd.
    • 7.1.11. Alcatel-Lucent
      • 7.1.11.1 Alcatel-Lucent Cable Factory in Calais
      • 7.1.11.2 Alcatel-Lucent in Taiwan-AJC
      • 7.1.11.3 Alcatel-Lucent in Fiji-AJC
      • 7.1.11.4 Alcatel Shanghai Cable Depot
    • 7.1.12. Jasmine Submarine Telecommunications Co., Ltd. (JSTC)
      • 7.1.12.1 Marine Operations Service
      • 7.1.12.2 Land/Submarine Fiber Optic Cable Jointing Team and Equipment
  • 7.2. Depot Accessibility
  • 7.3. Universal Joint (UJ)
    • 7.3.1. Locations of UJC Member Companies Jointer Training Schools
    • 7.3.2. Introduction to Jointer Training
    • 7.3.3. New Technology Transfer
    • 7.3.4. UJC Training Standard
    • 7.3.5. Training Course Syllabus

Chapter 8: Market Participants

  • 8.1. Various Participants
    • 8.1.1. France Telecom
    • 8.1.2. NTT/NTT WE Marine
    • 8.1.3. KDDI/KCS
    • 8.1.4. Jasmine Submarine Telecommunications Company (JSTC)
    • 8.1.5. Others
  • 8.2. System Suppliers
    • 8.2.1. TE SubCom
    • 8.2.2. Alcatel-Lucent Submarine Networks
    • 8.2.3. NSW (Norddeutsch Seekabelwerke GmbH)
    • 8.2.4. Huawei Marine Networks
    • 8.2.5. Other Turnkey System Suppliers
    • 8.2.6. Non-Turnkey System Suppliers
  • 8.3. Marine Services Providers
    • 8.3.1. Survey
    • 8.3.2. Burial Equipment
    • 8.3.3. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs)
    • 8.3.4. Cable Handling Equipment
    • 8.3.5. Cable Deployment Management Systems
    • 8.3.6. Shore-End Services
    • 8.3.7. Regulatory Management Services
    • 8.3.8. Environmental Management Services

Chapter 9: Forecast Cableship Demand

  • 9.1. Forecast of New Cables (Route Kilometers): 2010-2015
  • 9.2. Forecast Cableship Demand for Installation
    • 9.2.1. Forecast Methodology (Including Assumptions)
  • 9.3. Forecast Cableship Demand for Maintenance
    • 9.3.1. Existing Maintenance Agreements
    • 9.3.2. Forecast Methodology (Assumptions, Fault Frequency, Fault Repair Times)
    • 9.3.3. Number of Maintenance Ships Required

Chapter 10: Technology and Development Trends

  • 10.1. Plowing Equipment and Facilities
  • 10.2. Jetting Equipment and Facilities
  • 10.3. Jointing Equipment and Facilities
    • 10.3.1. Universal Jointing (UJ) 1
    • 10.3.2. Proprietary Manufacturers' Jointing
  • 10.4. Development of Burial Tools 1
    • 10.4.1. Increased Bollard Pull (from 40-60 Tonnes to 150 Tonnes)
    • 10.4.2. 3 Meter (Jetting) Plows
    • 10.4.3. 3 Meter ROV Jetting Packages
    • 10.4.4. 5 Meter Plows
  • 10.5. Developments in Route Planning
    • 10.5.1. Digital Terrain Modeling-Minimizing Unsupported Cable Spans
    • 10.5.2. Burial Assessment Surveys-Improving Burial Results and Confirming Armor Decisions
  • 10.6. Dynamic Positioning Improvement-Improving Cable Positioning and Slack Management
  • 10.7. Development in Cable Laying Control Systems-Minimizing Loops and Unsupported Spans
  • 10.8. Touchdown Monitoring-Validating Cable Bottom Position and/or Burial
  • 10.9. Post-lay Inspection (PLI)-Validating Burial Data
  • 10.10. Cable Awareness-Cable Awareness Charts, Fisheries Liaison
  • 10.11. Shallow Water Protection-Horizontal Directional Drilling, Split Pipe, Cable Pinning

Chapter 11: Conclusions and Observations

  • 11.1. Observations
    • 11.1.1. Submarine Telecommunications Marine Services Market
    • 11.1.2. Vessels
    • 11.1.3. Services
    • 11.1.4. The Future

Appendix 1: Worldwide Cableship Inventory

  • A1.1. Active Cableships Worldwide
  • A1.2. Inactive Cableships Worldwide
  • A1.3. Vessels Converted from Telecommunications to Other Uses
    • A1.3.1. Decommissioned Vessels
    • A1.3.2. Vessels Currently Working in Other Sectors
    • A1.3.3. Survey Vessels (i.e. not installation and maintenance)

Appendix 2: Profiles of Key Industry Players

  • A2.1. Alcatel-Lucent
    • A2.1.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.1.2. Vessels
    • A2.1.3. Ownership
    • A2.1.4. Headquarters
    • A2.1.5. History
      • A2.1.5.1 Changing and Expanding
      • A2.1.5.2 Looking Forward
    • A2.1.6. Undersea Systems
      • A2.1.6.1 Regional Submarine Networks
      • A2.1.6.2 Unrepeatered Submarine Networks
      • A2.1.6.3 Offshore and Scientific Network Solutions
      • A2.1.6.4 Preserving the Environment
    • A2.1.7. Recent Projects
  • A2.2. Alda Marine
    • A2.2.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.2.2. Vessels
    • A2.2.3. Ownership
    • A2.2.4. Headquarters
    • A2.2.5. History
    • A2.2.6. Recent Projects
  • A2.3. Asean Cableship
    • A2.3.1. Corporate Information
      • A2.3.1.1 Headquarters
    • A2.3.2. Capabilities
      • A2.3.2.1 Cable Installation
      • A2.3.2.2 Cable Maintenance
      • A2.3.2.3 Engineering Consultancy
    • A2.3.3. Vessels
    • A2.3.4. Barge
    • A2.3.5. Submersibles
  • A2.4. Blue Star Line Ltd.
    • A2.4.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.4.2. Ownership
    • A2.4.3. History
    • A2.4.4. Headquarters
    • A2.4.5. Background
    • A2.4.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.4.7. Capabilities
    • A2.4.8. Fleet
  • A2.5. CTC Marine (CTC)
    • A2.5.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.5.2. Ownership
    • A2.5.3. History
    • A2.5.4. Headquarters
    • A2.5.5. History
    • A2.5.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.5.7. Track Record
    • A2.5.8. Capabilities
      • A2.5.8.1 Jet Trenching ROVs
      • A2.5.8.2 Mechanical Trenchers
      • A2.5.8.3 Pipeline Ploughs
    • A2.5.9. Vessels
    • A2.5.10. Cable Ploughs
    • A2.5.11. Supporting Equipment
      • A2.5.11.1 CAROUSEL
      • A2.5.11.2 PHC 1
      • A2.5.11.3 PHC 2
  • A2.6. E-Marine PJSC
    • A2.6.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.6.2. Ownership
    • A2.6.3. History
    • A2.6.4. Headquarters
    • A2.6.5. Background
    • A2.6.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.6.7. Capabilities
    • A2.6.8. Vessels
    • A2.6.9. Cable Depots
  • A2.7. France Telecom Marine (FT)
    • A2.7.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.7.2. Ownership
    • A2.7.3. Headquarters
    • A2.7.4. Background
    • A2.7.5. Recent Projects
    • A2.7.6. Capabilities
  • A2.8. Global Marine Systems Limited (GMSL)
    • A2.8.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.8.2. Ownership
    • A2.8.3. History
    • A2.8.4. Headquarters
    • A2.8.5. Background
    • A2.8.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.8.7. Capabilities
  • A2.9. Huawei Marine Networks Co., Limited
    • A2.9.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.9.2. Ownership
    • A2.9.3. History
    • A2.9.4. Headquarters
    • A2.9.5. Background
    • A2.9.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.9.7. Capabilities
      • A2.9.7.1 Desk Top Studies
      • A2.9.7.2 System Design
      • A2.9.7.3 Route Survey
      • A2.9.7.4 Installation
      • A2.9.7.5 Training
      • A2.9.7.6 Maintenance
  • A2.10. it International Telecom
    • A2.10.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.10.2. Ownership
    • A2.10.3. History
    • A2.10.4. Headquarters
    • A2.10.5. Background
    • A2.10.6. Recent Projects
      • A2.10.6.1 Installation and Vessels
      • A2.10.6.2 Offshore Oil and Gas
      • A2.10.6.3 Power Cables
      • A2.10.6.4 Scientific Applications
      • A2.10.6.5 Mobile Gear
    • A2.10.7. Cable Protection
  • A2.11. Kokusai Cable Ship Co., Ltd. (KSC)
    • A2.11.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.11.2. Ownership
    • A2.11.3. Headquarters
    • A2.11.4. History
    • A2.11.5. Recent Projects
    • A2.11.6. Vessels
    • A2.11.7. Marine Survey and Measurement
    • A2.11.8. Facilities for Submarine Cable Laying, Burials, and Marine Surveys
    • A2.11.9. Universial Jointing Consortium (UJ Consortium)
    • A2.11.10. Other Services
      • A2.11.10.1 Marine Engineering
      • A2.11.10.2 Test of Subsea Equipment
      • A2.11.10.3 Analysis of Submarine Cable Failure Point
  • A2.12. KT Submarine Co. Ltd.
    • A2.12.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.12.2. Ownership
    • A2.12.3. History
    • A2.12.4. Headquarters
    • A2.12.5. Background
    • A2.12.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.12.7. Vessels
      • A2.12.7.1 Submersibles
  • A2.13. LD Travocean
    • A2.13.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.13.2. Ownership
    • A2.13.3. Headquarters
    • A2.13.4. Background
    • A2.13.5. Recent Projects
    • A2.13.6. Capabilities
      • A2.13.6.1 Laying and Protection of Submarine Cables:
      • A2.13.6.2 Burial System Development:
      • A2.13.6.3 Oil and Gas Industry:
      • A2.13.6.4 Support Vessels
      • A2.13.6.5 Rock Trenchers
      • A2.13.6.6 Ploughs
      • A2.13.6.7 Jetting/Dredging Vehicles
      • A2.13.6.8 Flying ROVs
  • A2.14. NTT World Engineering Marine Corporation (NTT WE Marine)
    • A2.14.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.14.2. Ownership
    • A2.14.3. History
    • A2.14.4. Headquarters
    • A2.14.5. History
    • A2.14.6. Recent Projects
    • A2.14.7. Capabilities
      • A2.14.7.1 Consulting
      • A2.14.7.2 Marine survey
      • A2.14.7.3 Cable laying
    • A2.14.8. Other services
  • A2.15. S.B. Submarine Systems (SBSS) Ltd.
    • A2.15.1. Corporate Information
    • A2.15.2. Ownership
    • A2.15.3. Headquarters
    • A2.15.4. History
    • A2.15.5. Recent Projects
    • A2.15.6. Capabilities
      • A2.15.6.1 Cable Jointer Training
      • A2.15.6.2 Research and Development
      • A2.15.6.3 DTS and Route Engineering
      • A2.15.6.4 Subsea Burial Technology
      • A2.15.6.5 Project Management
    • A2.15.7. Vessels
  • A2.16. TE Subcom
    • A2.16.1. Corporate Information
      • A2.16.1.1 Ownership
      • A2.16.1.2 History
      • A2.16.1.3 Headquarters
      • A2.16.1.4 Background
    • A2.16.2. Recent Projects
    • A2.16.3. Capabilities
      • A2.16.3.1 Project Management
      • A2.16.3.2 Design
      • A2.16.3.3 Desktop Study (DTS)
      • A2.16.3.4 Route Planning
      • A2.16.3.5 Route Survey
      • A2.16.3.6 Cable Engineering
      • A2.16.3.7 Permitting
      • A2.16.3.8 Manufacturing
      • A2.16.3.9 Dry Plant Manufacturing
      • A2.16.3.10 Fiber Optic Undersea Cable Manufacturing
      • A2.16.3.11 Repeater Manufacturing
      • A2.16.3.12 Undersea Branching Units (BU)
      • A2.16.3.13 Joint Manufacturing
      • A2.16.3.14 Dry Plant Installation
      • A2.16.3.15 Dry Plant Testing
      • A2.16.3.16 Wet Plant Installation
      • A2.16.3.17 Wet Plant Testing
      • A2.16.3.18 Fleet
      • A2.16.3.19 Submersible Tools
      • A2.16.3.20 Documentation
      • A2.16.3.21 Customer Care and Maintenance
      • A2.16.3.22 Customer Training
      • A2.16.3.23 Global Technical Support Center
      • A2.16.3.24 Maintenance Ships
      • A2.16.3.25 Geographic Information System (GIS)
      • A2.16.3.26 Cable Jointing Services
      • A2.16.3.27 Jointing Training
      • A2.16.3.28 Fishing Liaison and Cable Awareness

Appendix 3: Inventory of Additional Industry Players

  • A3.1. Baltic Offshore
    • A3.1.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.1.2. Headquarters
    • A3.1.3. Services
      • A3.1.3.1 Maintenance
    • A3.1.4. Vessel/Contact Information
      • A3.1.4.1 Spare Cable Depot
      • A3.1.4.2 Installations
  • A3.2. Draka and Prysmian
    • A3.2.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.2.2. Prysmian Cables and Systems
    • A3.2.3. Survey
    • A3.2.4. Installation
    • A3.2.5. Post-Sale and Maintenance
  • A3.3. CGGE International
    • A3.3.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.3.2. Headquarters
    • A3.3.3. Vessels
    • A3.3.4. Survey Systems
    • A3.3.5. Technical Operations
  • A3.4. Five Oceans Services
    • A3.4.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.4.2. Recent Projects
    • A3.4.3. Headquarters
  • A3.5. Geological Assistance and Services (G.A.S.)
    • A3.5.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.5.2. Headquarters
    • A3.5.3. Survey Fleet:
  • A3.6. Italcable/Prysmian
  • A3.7. Gazflot
    • A3.7.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.7.2. Headquarters
  • A3.8. IHC Engineering Business Ltd. (EB)
    • A3.8.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.8.2. Headquarters
  • A3.9. Jasmine Submarine Telecommunications CO., LTD
    • A3.9.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.9.2. History
    • A3.9.3. Background
    • A3.9.4. Ownership
    • A3.9.5. Headquarters
    • A3.9.6. Other Business and Services
      • A3.9.6.1 Marine Operation Service
      • A3.9.6.2 Land/Submarine Fiber Optic Cable Jointing Team and Equipment
  • A3.10. Maju Geohydro
    • A3.10.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.10.2. Headquarters
  • A3.11. Makai Ocean Engineering
    • A3.11.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.11.2. Contact Information
  • A3.12. Maritime Safety Administration of the Peoples Republic of China
    • A3.12.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.12.2. Headquarters
  • A3.13. Maritime and Underwater Security Consultants (MUSC)
    • A3.13.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.13.2. Headquarters
  • A3.14. MS Diversified Services Pty Limited (MSD)
    • A3.14.1. Headquarters
  • A3.15. North Sea Shipping
    • A3.15.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.15.2. Headquarters
  • A3.16. Offshore Marine Management (OMM) Solutions
    • A3.16.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.16.2. Recent Projects
    • A3.16.3. Contact Information
  • A3.17. Oceanscan
    • A3.17.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.17.2. Headquarters
  • A3.18. Red Penguin Associates (Marine and Cable Engineering Consultants)
    • A3.18.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.18.2. Services
    • A3.18.3. Experience
      • A3.18.3.1 Recently Completed projects include:
    • A3.18.4. Contact Information
  • A3.19. Polar Marine Geosurvey Expedition
    • A3.19.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.19.2. Headquarters
  • A3.20. Romona Inc
  • A3.21. Seaworks (Owns Fjordkabel Maintenance Vessel)
    • A3.21.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.21.2. Headquarters
    • A3.21.3. Services
      • A3.21.3.1 Offshore
      • A3.21.3.2 Seabed mapping
  • A3.22. Relacom (Owns CS/MV Telepaatti)
    • A3.22.1. History
    • A3.22.2. Vessel
      • A3.22.2.1 Telepaatti
    • A3.22.3. Contact Information
  • A3.23. SEtech
    • A3.23.1. Headquarters
  • A3.24. South West Surveys (UK) Ltd.
    • A3.24.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.24.2. Headquarters
  • A3.25. Acergy / Subsea 7
    • A3.25.1. Corporate Information
    • A3.25.2. Fleet
    • A3.25.3. Headquarters

FIGURES:

Chapter 3: Deep Water Marine Services-Installation and Repair

  • Figure 3-1: Typical Grapnel Rigging
  • Figure 3-2: Debris Recovered During a PLGR
  • Figure 3-3: Route Clearance Operation
  • Figure 3-4: Low Profile Anchor and Slip Lines
  • Figure 3-5: Load Plan
  • Figure 3-6: How Cable is Coiled
  • Figure 3-7: How Repeaters are Stored
  • Figure 3-8: Trailing Cable
  • Figure 3-9: Example of a Repeater Stack
  • Figure 3-10: Cable Transporter
  • Figure 3-11: Armor Cable with Keystone
  • Figure 3-12: Protection of Cables
  • Figure 3-13: Spare Repeater Rack
  • Figure 3-14: Impactograph
  • Figure 3-15: Temporary Cable Tanks and Temporary Repeater Storage Racks
  • Figure 3-16: Standard Barge Outfitted with a Cable Tank
  • Figure 3-17: 40 Foot Open Top Container
  • Figure 3-18: Various Modes of PLSE Transport
  • Figure 3-19: An Example of Direct Landing
  • Figure 3-20: ROV' s Gripper Attachment
  • Figure 3-21: Correctly Applying Cable Slack for Deployment
  • Figure 3-22: Towed Sea Plows
  • Figure 3-23: Deployment of a Cable Buoy
  • Figure 3-24:Typical Rigging for a Streamed Cable End
  • Figure 3-25: Joining Cables Together
  • Figure 3-26: ROV with Water Jetting Swords
  • Figure 3-27: ROV Video Stills
  • Figure 3-28: Trenching ROV with Jetting Swords Extended
  • Figure 3-29: Launch and Recovery System for Deploying ROVs
  • Figure 3-30: Cable Tracking Device
  • Figure 3-31: Sonar Image from an ROV Operation
  • Figure 3-32: An Acoustic Pulse
  • Figure 3-33: An Example of a Branching Unit Positioning
  • Figure 3-34: Branching Unit Assembly
  • Figure 3-35:Adjustments to Cable Route and Buoys
  • Figure 3-36: Sequence of Operations for Installing a Branching Unit
  • Figure 3-37: Initial Splice Deployment
  • Figure 3-38: Final Splice Deployment
  • Figure 3-39: Deployment of Repair Splice and Bight
  • Figure 3-40: The Splicing Process
  • Figure 3-41: Cleaning Bare Fibers
  • Figure 3-42: Fiber Cleaver
  • Figure 3-43: Automatic Alignment of Fiber Cores
  • Figure 3-44: A Fusion Splicer
  • Figure 3-45: Typical Power Feed Equipment
  • Figure 3-46: COTDR Testing Instrument
  • Figure 3-47: COTDR Trace
  • Figure 3-48: OSA Trace
  • Figure 3-49: Megohm-Meter (Megger)
  • Figure 3-50: Measuring Power with a Power Meter
  • Figure 3-51: OTDR and an OTDR Trace
  • Figure 3-52: Tone Generator and a Tone Detector
  • Figure 3-53: A Beach Master Overseeing a Shore End Landing
  • Figure 3-54: Start of Cable Lay
  • Figure 3-55: Initial Splice Deployment
  • Figure 3-56: Final Bight Deployment
  • Figure 3-57: Acceptable and Unacceptable Crossing Angles
  • Figure 3-58: Avoiding Amor/Unarmored Crossings
  • Figure 3-59: Applying Protective Sleeves
  • Figure 3-60: Water Depth Recommendation between Repeaters and Cable Crossings
  • Figure 3-61: Cable Bights Near Crossing
  • Figure 3-62: Branching Unit Placement
  • Figure 3-63: Parallel Cable Routing
  • Figure 3-64: Using Protective Sleeves for Cable and Pipe Line Separation
  • Figure 3-65: Using Concrete Blocks
  • Figure 3-66: Constructed Rock Berms
  • Figure 3-67: Repair Steps
  • Figure 3-68: A Cableship Cross Section
  • Figure 3-69: Cable Drums
  • Figure 3-70: A Typical LCE
  • Figure 3-71: Typical Cable Counter
  • Figure 3-72: Installing Dynamometers
  • Figure 3-73: Navigational Equipment Screen
  • Figure 3-74: GPS Satellites
  • Figure 3-75: Environmental Forces and Propulsion Systems
  • Figure 3-76: Echo Sounder System

Chapter 4: Shallow Water Marine Services-Installation and Repair

  • Figure 4-1: Cable Pinning
  • Figure 4-2: Measurement of a 2 Meter Burial
  • Figure 4-3: Steel Conduits
  • Figure 4-4: Diver Inspection of a Cable
  • Figure 4-5: A Wire Winch
  • Figure 4-6: Pulling around a Quadrant
  • Figure 4-7: A Turnaround Sheave
  • Figure 4-8: Using a Deadman Anchor
  • Figure 4-9: Typical Shore End Landing
  • Figure 4-10: Use of an Armor Clamp
  • Figure 4-11: PLSE Shore End Landing
  • Figure 4-12: Injector and Rock Sa
  • Figure 4-13: Articulated Pipe
  • Figure 4-14: Diver Jetting
  • Figure 4-15: A Required Pipe Conduit
  • Figure 4-16: Common Equipment Used in Shallow Water Installation
  • Figure 4-17: Typical Tug and Barge Burial Operation
  • Figure 4-18: Shallow Water Work
  • Figure 4-19: A Landing Craft Vessel
  • Figure 4-20: Jack up Barge and Catamaran
  • Figure 4-21: Self Propelled Jetting Tool Burying Cable
  • Figure 4-22: Shallow Water Plow Burying Cable
  • Figure 4-23: Self Propelled Rock Trencher

Chapter 5: Marine Survey Market

  • Figure 5-1: Hull Mounted MBES Transducers (Simrad/Kongsberg EM300 and EM1000)
  • Figure 5-2: Swath Bathymetry (Hull Mounted)
  • Figure 5-3: Example of Charted Cable Route Bathymetry
  • Figure 5-4: Sidescan Sonar Towfish
  • Figure 5-5: Sidescan Sonar Depiction
  • Figure 5-6: Slant Range Correction
  • Figure 5-7: Sub-bottom Reflection
  • Figure 5-8: Sub-bottom Profile, Co-located Against Sidescan Sonar Data
  • Figure 5-9: SeaSpy Magnetometer
  • Figure 5-10: Magnetic Anomaly
  • Figure 5-11: Gravity Corer (left) and Grab Sampler (right)
  • Figure 5-12: Mini-CPT Rig
  • Figure 5-13: CPT Sensors: Standard Load Cells (a), Piezocone (b)
  • Figure 5-14: Interpreted CPT Log
  • Figure 5-15: C-BASS Towed E-BAS Sled
  • Figure 5-16: USBL Head (usually pole mounted)

Chapter 6: Maintenance Arrangements

  • Figure 6-1: Maintenance Zones in the Indian Ocean and Pacific Regions
  • Figure 6-2: MECMA Club Maintenance Arrangement in the Mediterranean
  • Figure 6-3: Vessel Coverage, Yokohama Zone, PIOCMA
  • Figure 6-4: Asia Private Maintenance Agreement
  • Figure 6-5: South Pacific Maintenance Agreement (Private)

Chapter 7: Submarine Cable Storage

  • Figure 7-1: E-marine Cable Depot
  • Figure 7-2: TE SubCom Cable Depot Locations
  • Figure 7-3: TE SubCom Jointing Services and Cable Maintenance
  • Figure 7-4: SBSS Maintenance Depot and Services Operate Out of Wujing, Shanghai, China
  • Figure 7-5: SBSS Wujing Cable Depot
  • Figure 7-6: Wujing Depot
  • Figure 7-7: Wujing Depot Plan
  • Figure 7-8: KDDI Ocean Link and Yokohama Zone Maintenance
  • Figure 7-9: KTS Depot, Korea Supports Yokohama Maintenance Zone
  • Figure 7-10: KTS Depot Location
  • Figure 7-11: GMSL Bermuda Cable Depot
  • Figure 7-12: GMSL Portland (UK) Cable Depot Training Facility
  • Figure 7-13: Elettra Cable Depot, Catania, Sicily
  • Figure 7-14: FT' s Depots at Kalamata, Catania and La Seyne Sur Mer
  • Figure 7-15: FT' s Vessel Rene Descartes at Cable Depot La Seyne Sur Mer
  • Figure 7-16: FT' s Leon Thevenin Operates from its Atlantic Marine Base (BMA) at Brest, France
  • Figure 7-17: Baltic Offshore 7 Meter Diameter Cable Tank Arrangement
  • Figure 7-18: Baltic Offshore Depot, Port of Kalmar, Sweden
  • Figure 7-19: IT International Telecom Depot Facility in Halifax, Canada
  • Figure 7-20: IT International Telecom Depot Location, Halifax
  • Figure 7-21: Sembawang Cable Depot Location
  • Figure 7-22: Cable Tanks at SNS cable Depot, Singapore
  • Figure 7-24: CS Lodbrog
  • Figure 7-23: JSTC' s Barge (believed to operate out of its Thailand base)

Chapter 8: Various Participants

  • Figure 8-1: Linear Cable Engine and Cable Drum

Chapter 9: Forecast Cableship Dema

  • Figure 9-1: Worldwide Forecasted and Planned Cable Kilometers 2011-2015
  • Figure 9-2: Intercontinental Forecasted Cable Kilometers 2011-2015
  • Figure 9-3: Intra-Regional Forecasted Cable Kilometers 2011-2015
  • Figure 9-4: Ship Days Required for Installation
  • Figure 9-5: Cableship Demand for Installation 2010-2015
  • Figure 9-6: Ship Days Required for Maintenance 2010-2015
  • Figure 9-7: Cable Kilometers in Water
  • Figure 9-8: Time to Repair Non-Deep Water Faults
  • Figure 9-9: Average Seasonally-Adjusted Time to Repair
  • Figure 9-10: Cableship Demand for Maintenance 2010-2015

Chapter 10: Technology and Development Trends

  • Figure 10-1: SMD MD-3 HD Plow
  • Figure 10-2: EB Sea Stallion 3 HD Plow
  • Figure 10-3: Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)
  • Figure 10-4: Splicing and Molding Machines onboard Alcatel-Lucent' s CS Ile de Batz
  • Figure 10-5: Universal Joint Assembly
  • Figure 10-6: Real-time Monitoring of Cable Profile and Bottom Touchdown
  • Figure 10-7: Articulated Pipe and Pinning

Appendix 1: Worldwide Cableship Inventory

  • Appendix Figure 1-1: Converted Deep Water Cable Vessels
  • Appendix Table 1-1: Active Cableships Worldwide
  • Appendix Table 1-2: Converted Deep Water Cableships
  • Appendix Table 1-3: Decommissioned Cableships
  • Appendix Table 1-4: Cableships Working in Other Markets

Appendix 2: Profiles of Key Industry Players

  • Appendix Figure 2-1: Vessel Ile De Batz Operated by Alcatel-Lucent for Laying Operations
  • Appendix Figure 2-2: ASEAN Cableship Headquarters
  • Appendix Figure 2-3: GMSL Headquarters and Locations
  • Appendix Figure 2-4: Survey on whale behavior using the autonomous underwater vehicle, AE2000
  • Appendix Table 2-1: CTC' s Fleet of Jet Trenching ROVs
  • Appendix Table 2-2: CTC' s Fleet of Mechanical Trenchers
  • Appendix Table 2-3: CTC' s Fleet of Pipeline Ploughs
  • Appendix Table 2-4: CTC' s Vessel Inventory
  • Appendix Table 2-5: CTC' s Cable Ploughs
  • Appendix Table 2-6: History of KCS
  • Appendix Table 2-7: Recent Projects
  • Appendix Table 2-8: Track Record on Submarine Cable Installation
  • Appendix Table 2-9: Track Record on Offshore Oil and Gas Industry and Renewable Energy
  • Appendix Table 2-10: Track Record on Submarine Cable Maintenance
  • Appendix Table 2-11: TE Subcom' s Subsea Project Track Record

Appendix 3: Inventory of Additional Industry Players

  • Appendix Figure 3-1: Prysmian' s Vessel Giulio Verne
  • Appendix Figure 3-2: MV Telepaatti
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