表紙
市場調査レポート

オーストラリアのデータアナリティクス・M2M・サイバー犯罪・データセンターの市場

Australia - Data Analytics, M2M, Cyber Crime and Data Centres

発行 BuddeComm 商品コード 278433
出版日 ページ情報 英文 189 Pages
即納可能
価格
本日の銀行送金レート: 1USD=101.75円で換算しております。
Back to Top
オーストラリアのデータアナリティクス・M2M・サイバー犯罪・データセンターの市場 Australia - Data Analytics, M2M, Cyber Crime and Data Centres
出版日: 2016年07月26日 ページ情報: 英文 189 Pages
概要

当レポートでは、オーストラリアの通信市場における最新動向 - データアナリティクスやM2M (機械間通信)・サイバー犯罪対策・データセンター、更にはクラウドコンピューティング・ビッグデータ・IoT・ネットワークセキュリティなどの現状と将来展望 - について分析し、市場・技術の現状や今後の方向性、統計データ、ケーススタディ、国際市場の動向などを調査しております。

第1章 データアナリティクスの傾向と発展

  • 「スマート社会」

第2章 オーストラリアのビッグデータ市場

  • ビッグデータとデータ解析 (アナリティクス)
  • 主な傾向と発展
  • 市場統計と調査

第3章 クラウド技術の傾向と統計

  • クラウドコンピューティング革命
  • クラウドコンピューティング市場:分析
  • 政府機関向けクラウドコンピューティング
  • 民間企業向けクラウドコンピューティング
  • クラウドコンピューティングの複雑性
  • ユニファイドコミュニケーション (UC) とクラウド
  • クラウドコンピューティング市場の統計データ
  • ビッグデータの管理・保全方法
  • クラウド技術の傾向と機会
  • 中国のクラウドコンピューティングとビッグデータ
  • 結論

第4章 オーストラリアのデータセンター

  • 市場概況
  • データセンター市場の変化:市場分析
  • データセンターの新たな傾向
  • より広範囲での産業動向と発展
  • インターネット相互接続点 (IX)
  • 相互接続点 (POI)
  • ネットワーク接続ストレージ (NAS)
  • 主要企業 (全23社)

第5章 IoT (モノのインターネット) とM2M (機械間通信)

  • 世界のM2Mの傾向
  • オーストラリアのIoT・M2M市場

第6章 インターネットガバナンス・eセキュリティ・ネットの中立性に関する考察

  • 世界的な課題・傾向・発展
  • オーストラリア国内の状況

図表一覧

このページに掲載されている内容は最新版と異なる場合があります。詳細はお問い合わせください。

目次

Overview

This annual report offers a wealth of information on the all important ICT developments in the telecoms sector and is a key resource of insights, statistics, examples and trends. The industry is in transformation driven by these new developments and players from the different technology sectors are now converging and merging into a broader wholesale market model. These disruptive developments will force changes to many traditional business models across many different industry sectors.

Subjects covered include:

  • Big data, AI and data analytics
  • Cloud Computing
  • Data Centres
  • M2M, LTE-A and 5G
  • The Internet of Things

Executive Summary

ICT sectors are merging into a new wholesale platform for the networked economy

There certainly is a lot of interest in the IoT (personal devices) and M2M (industrial applications) market. But what we are seeing is only what is happening on the surface. Most of the IoT and M2M activities are taking place unseen. For example, all new electronic devices (smartphones, tablets, set-top boxes, game consoles) are now IoT devices. Wearable technology has also become a thriving part of the IoT industry, with an ever-broadening range of possible uses and devices, including smart watches, glasses, clothing items, skin patches, and even implants for health monitoring.

Tens of millions of smart meters have already been deployed by the electricity industry, with literally hundreds of millions of them in the pipeline. Healthcare is another key industry. All new hospitals now operate large-scale M2M operations, tracking their equipment with real-time information. Most local governments have invested massively in mapping their assets; this is now being followed up by adding connectivity to these assets - whether it be streetlamps, drainage, sewerage or trees, all are in the process of becoming part of a smart city. The number of connected M2M devices in Australia will grow to somewhere between 25 million and 50 million by 2020. Progress is still hampered by lack of standards, interoperability and effective government and industry collaboration.

The intelligent outcome of the use of the various new technologies is known as big data. This can only be achieved through connected information management and data collaboration. Open data systems are therefore critical to its success. Governments are increasing the number of data sets they make available to the public and data collaboration between businesses is also starting to happen.

These intelligent transactions are mostly taking place in the cloud, with data centres forming the intelligent hubs between the clouds. Cloud computing has become one of the fastest-growing areas for the IT sector, and cloud computing solutions are being adopted by enterprises; government and consumers alike. In 2015 cloud computing has become more mainstream, with the majority of large enterprises adopting various solutions. Small and medium-sized businesses still largely need to start on the road to cloud computing, while close to 90% of larger businesses in developed economies have already embraced it. Few people realise the enormous impact that cloud computing is already making.

The other critical element for the future of these ICT developments is the network quality needed for those billions of intelligent transactions between all of the IoT and M2M devices. This data needs to be collected and processed to then deliver executable outcomes with real-time analyses to the IoT and M2M devices and their users, being consumers, businesses, government organisations, utilities, traffic authorities and so on.

In order to successfully implement the emerging networked economy far more robust infrastructure is required than is currently available. The NBN and 4G LTE-Advanced - a halfway house on the way to full 5G - are going to provide that robust infrastructure necessary for high-speed information processing, distributed computing, as well as many other applications that can be processed, analysed and managed - all in real time over a cloud computer-based IT platform. Ubiquitous access, enormous capacity, low latency, robustness and symmetric access, as well as the very high levels of reliability, quality and security, are all critical to the success of such a new communications environment.

The importance of access to infrastructure in these ICT developments is leading to convergence of what are still largely separate sectors (big data, IoT, M2M, cloud computing, data centres and telecoms wholesale). This will lead to mergers and acquisitions between the various companies involved in these activities, and winners and losers will be attached to this process; it will be a very dynamic and rapidly changing market over the next few years.

Social and economic developments are further accelerating, and as more organisations tap into this merged ICT space and more investments are made we will see further astonishing innovations emerge over the next few years.

Over time this will have a major impact on the economy. The emerging networked economy will become decentralised with more innovative new jobs and business opportunities being shared. Smart cities are going to play a key role in this new economy.

Given the current social, economic and political turbulence, it becomes clear that we seem to have reached a ceiling in the way we currently use our intellectual ability to address the complex issues that society is facing.

The need for increased intelligence will lead to a merging of human activities and machines, something that is becoming increasingly possible and is heading towards the broader concept of artificial intelligence (AI). Some of the predictions and scenarios discussed in this context are clearly wrong, and AI as described by the popular media is, if it really happens, at least a century away; nevertheless we are pushing the boundaries of our current level of intelligence capacity and, while most current predictions will lead to totally different outcomes, one thing is certain - things will change.

In the end it is all about people - smart people in charge of all of these processes. What is needed is a vision from the top and smart communities working from the bottom upwards.

Table of Contents

1. Trends and developments in data analytics

  • 1.1 Smart societies
    • 1.1.1 The proposition
    • 1.1.2 Philosophy and science
    • 1.1.3 Social and economic developments
    • 1.1.4 Are we reaching another breaking point?
    • 1.1.5 Solutions by using information technology to increase our intelligence
    • 1.1.6 Examples of developments
    • 1.1.7 Conclusion

2. The data analytics market in Australia

  • 2.1 Big Data - Data Analytics
    • 2.1.1 High quality data and analytics can improve customer relationships
    • 2.1.2 Data silos
    • 2.1.3 Contextual intelligence
    • 2.1.4 Benefits for telcos and ISPs
    • 2.1.5 Social Network Analytics
    • 2.1.6 Subscriber Data Management
    • 2.1.7 Open data policy
    • 2.1.8 6000 sets of government info goes public
    • 2.1.9 Telcos and the science of big data - Analysis
  • 2.2 Key trends and Developments
    • 2.2.1 Data access policy for smart cities
    • 2.2.2 NSW government's dedicated data analytics office
    • 2.2.3 Connected Information Management (CIM)
    • 2.2.4 Deep packet inspection
    • 2.2.5 Ubiquitous Complex Event Processing
    • 2.2.6 Behavioural Attitudinal Geolocation
    • 2.2.7 Advanced recommendations engines
    • 2.2.8 Lifetime customer relationships
    • 2.2.9 Data analytics solutions for Smart Grids
    • 2.2.10 Cryptography
  • 2.3 Market Statistics and Surveys
    • 2.3.1 Australian Big Data and Analytics Study
    • 2.3.2 Smart Cities and the open data dilemma
    • 2.3.3 Big Data progress hampered by lack of infrastructure

3. Cloud technology trends and statistics 2016

  • 3.1 The cloud computing revolution
    • 3.1.1 As-a-Service offerings and statistics
    • 3.1.2 Off-premises cloud data centres
  • 3.2 Cloud Computing market - analysis
  • 3.3 Cloud computing for government
    • 3.3.1 Governments around the world adopting cloud services (g-clouds)
  • 3.4 Cloud computing for enterprise
  • 3.5 The complexities of cloud computing
    • 3.5.1 Information technology
    • 3.5.2 Cloud security
  • 3.6 Unified Communications (UC) and the cloud
    • 3.6.1 Early days
    • 3.6.2 UC&C today
  • 3.7 Cloud computing market statistics
  • 3.8 How to manage and secure big data
  • 3.9 Cloud technology trends and opportunites
  • 3.10 China - cloud computing and data centres
    • 3.10.1 Cloud Computing for music
    • 3.10.2 Will broadcasting move to the cloud?
    • 3.10.3 Cisco focuses on cloud services
    • 3.10.4 Smart Grid as a Cloud Service (SGaaS)
    • 3.10.5 Network Attached Storage (NAS)
    • 3.10.6 Mobile Cloud Computing
  • 3.11 Conclusion
    • 3.11.1 Cloud Computing requires business strategies
    • 3.11.2 Cloud Computing in the trans-sector context

4. Data centres in Australia

  • 4.1 Market overview
  • 4.2 The changing market of data centres - market analysis
    • 4.2.1 Datacentre market analysis
    • 4.2.2 Selective outsourcing
    • 4.2.3 Glimpses of the future
    • 4.2.4 Infrastructure requirements
  • 4.3 Emerging Data Centre Trends
    • 4.3.1 Increased Usage of Managed Hosting to Cloud Services
    • 4.3.2 High-Density Data Centre Requirements
    • 4.3.3 Consolidation to Larger, More Efficient Data Centres
    • 4.3.4 Cloud Providers Driving the Growth of Data Centre Ecosystems
  • 4.4 Wider Industry Trends and developments
    • 4.4.1 Call centres to go digital
    • 4.4.2 Software-defined data centres (SDD)
  • 4.5 Internet Exchanges
    • 4.5.1 Overview
    • 4.5.2 Neutral Ixs
  • 4.6 Points of Interconnect (POI)
  • 4.7 Network Attached Storage (NAS)
  • 4.8 Major Players
    • 4.8.1 Australian Data Centres
    • 4.8.2 The Australian Liquidity Centre (ALC)
    • 4.8.3 Canberra Data Centres (CDC)
    • 4.8.4 Datacom
    • 4.8.5 Digital Pacific
    • 4.8.6 Digital Realty
    • 4.8.7 Equinix
    • 4.8.8 Fujitsu Australia
    • 4.8.9 Geraldton datacentre
    • 4.8.10 Global Switch
    • 4.8.11 Hewlett-Packard (HP)
    • 4.8.12 LiveOps
    • 4.8.13 IBM Australia
    • 4.8.14 Macquarie Telecom
    • 4.8.15 Metronode
    • 4.8.16 NEXTDC
    • 4.8.17 Polaris Data Centre
    • 4.8.18 Rackspace
    • 4.8.19 Syncom
    • 4.8.20 Telstra / PacNet
    • 4.8.21 Verizon
    • 4.8.22 Vocus Communications
    • 4.8.23 YourDC - Adelaide

5. The Internet of Things and Machine to Machine communications

  • 5.1 Global M2M trends
    • 5.1.1 Analysis of the M2M and IoT market
    • 5.1.2 OECD report on internet of things and M2M
    • 5.1.3 Global M2M market
    • 5.1.4 Internet of 'Things' (IoT)
    • 5.1.5 Telcos and the science of Big Data
    • 5.1.6 Sensors
    • 5.1.7 Radio-frequency identification (RFID)
    • 5.1.8 Application examples
    • 5.1.9 Conclusion: Connected lifestyle
  • 5.2 The IoT and M2M market in Australia
    • 5.2.1 Market and Industry Analyses
    • 5.2.2 Market Statistics
    • 5.2.3 Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) Networks
    • 5.2.4 Electricity companies and the M2M
    • 5.2.5 Smart Factory - Industry 4.0
    • 5.2.6 Selected Smart Projects
    • 5.2.7 Change in services driven by Sensing and monitoring information

6. Internet governance, E-Security and Net Neutrality insights

  • 6.1 Global issues, trends and developments
    • 6.1.1 Complex societies depend on ICT infrastructure
    • 6.1.2 The Internet and the economy - in statistics
    • 6.1.3 Control of the internet
    • 6.1.4 Case study - USA and Network neutrality
    • 6.1.5 The two sides of Net Neutrality
    • 6.1.6 E-security
    • 6.1.7 Cybercrime
    • 6.1.8 Security developments
    • 6.1.9 Be prepared with robust national infrastructure
    • 6.1.10 Conclusion - infrastructure essential for the digital economy
  • 6.2 The Australian scene
    • 6.2.1 $230m cybersecurity plan
    • 6.2.2 Government-industry collaboration is better than developing a surveillance state.
    • 6.2.3 How to move cybersecurity forward in a more positive way
    • 6.2.4 Is technology tinkering with our democratic principles?
    • 6.2.5 Cyber crime
    • 6.2.6 Data retention legislation
    • 6.2.7 Copyright laws for the digital economy
    • 6.2.8 Privacy and trust fundamentals of a digital economy
    • 6.2.9 Trade in Services Agreement - Telecommunications Annex
  • Table 1 - Selection of predictions in BT's timeline
  • Table 2 - Global Platform as a Service (PaaS) revenue - 2014 - 2018
  • Table 3 - Global Software as a Service (SaaS) revenue - 2014 - 2018
  • Table 4 - Global enterprise spending on cloud services and infrastructure - 2011 - 2017
  • Table 5 - Machine-to-machine applications and technologies, by dispersion and mobility
  • Table 6 - Global M2M module market- 2011; 2012; 2015; 2018
  • Table 7 - Global RFID market value - 2013-2015
  • Table 8 - Global RFID tag sales - 2013-2016
  • Table 9 - Australia's IoT home market
  • Table 10 - Telstra M2M statistics
  • Table 11 - Telstra M2M connections - 2009 - 2015
  • Table 12 - Telstra M2M revenue growth - 2011 - 2015
  • Table 13 - Global - Internet users and annual change - 2009 - 2016
  • Table 14 -Global IT security spending - 2011 - 2016
  • Exhibit 1 - From data analytics to Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  • Exhibit 2 - Watson in healthcare
  • Exhibit 3 - Real-time processing
  • Exhibit 4 - Watson - cognitive computing
  • Exhibit 5 - Key characteristics of contextual intelligence in customer service
  • Exhibit 6 - Definition: Cloud computing
  • Exhibit 7 - Amazon Web Services - a public cloud leader
  • Exhibit 8 - Examples of key cloud models
  • Exhibit 9 - Examples of government cloud projects
  • Exhibit 10 - Cloud principles
  • Exhibit 11 - Examples of enterprise cloud projects and development
  • Exhibit 12 - Planning Tool for Resource Integration, Synchronization, and Management (PRISM)
  • Exhibit 13 - IBM SmartCloud
  • Exhibit 14 - Pacnet
  • Exhibit 15 - Harvesting energy from radio frequency
  • Exhibit 16 - Weightless SIG
  • Exhibit 17 - The first major M2M alliances
  • Exhibit 18 - The OneM2M initiative
  • Exhibit 19 - Amazon Dash Button
  • Exhibit 20 - RFID spectrum frequencies and application examples
  • Exhibit 21 - Lifetime customer relationships
  • Exhibit 22 - Weightless SIG
  • Exhibit 23 - Design principles of industry 4.0
  • Exhibit 24 - Statistics on the impact of the Internet on the economy
  • Exhibit 25 - Implications of ending net neutrality
  • Exhibit 26 - Netherlands adopted net neutrality legislation
  • Exhibit 27 - Cyber crime statistics
  • Exhibit 28 - ACC UPDATE advice
  • Exhibit 29 - Australians express their concerns about privacy
  • Exhibit 30 - Statistics shows customers don't trust B2B companies
Back to Top