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コネクテッド (ネット接続型) ドローンの本格的普及への取り組み

Connected Drones… Seriously

発行 Heavy Reading 商品コード 328711
出版日 ページ情報 英文 24 Pages
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コネクテッド (ネット接続型) ドローンの本格的普及への取り組み Connected Drones… Seriously
出版日: 2015年04月23日 ページ情報: 英文 24 Pages
概要

この3年間で、ドローンは技術的にも市場面でも大きく成長しました。しかし、ドローンの構造を単純化し、より安く効率的に運用でき、実用に耐えるような水準に達するまでには、幾つもの課題を克服する必要があります。他方で、農業や環境保護、ロジスティクスなど、幅広い分野での活用が期待されています。インターネットへの接続対応に関しては、ドローンをネットワーク上のノード (節) としてどう取り扱うのかが焦点となっています。

当レポートでは、民間用・コネクテッド (ネット接続型) ドローンの市場・技術の将来展望について分析し、民間用ドローンの概要や機能、今後の普及に当たって解決すべき目下の課題、ネットワークとの接続・通信方式の概略、サプライヤー側の状況、主要企業のプロファイルなどを調査・考察しております。

第1章 イントロダクション:民間用ドローンは空を飛べるか?

第2章 機能別の内訳、プラットフォームの機能、通信

第3章 コネクテッド・ドローンの新たな課題

  • フライト制御と自動飛行
  • 「感知・回避」システム
  • アプリケーション用データの要件
  • 規制

第4章 ネットワーク上のノードとしてのドローン

第5章 供給サイドの概況

第6章 サプライヤーのプロファイル

  • AeroVironment
  • Airware
  • Boeing/Insitu
  • DJI
  • DreamHammer
  • DroneDeploy
  • Facebook/Ascenta
  • Google/Titan Aerospace
  • Matternet
  • Northrop Grumman
  • Parrot/senseFly
  • PixiePath
  • SkyCatch
  • Skydio

第7章 結論

目次
Product Code: Vol. 15, No. 3

The capability of drones to carry out an increasing range of tasks, and to make some existing processes simpler, cheaper and more effective, means that there is a wave of innovation and development happening around the world. Much of the innovation concerns the ways drones are connected - to each other, to the remote "pilot" and to other systems for control and use of data gathered from the drone. There are examples of drone-based services for monitoring, surveying (and surveillance), precision agriculture and logistics in many industries, and for environmental and humanitarian activities. Most intriguing of all, perhaps, is the potential for drones to act as nodes in public communications networks - extending the concept of battlefield airborne communication to the permanent delivery of connectivity in unserved or underserved locations.

This industry has been - and still is - looking for clear and sympathetic regulation of commercial drone activity. In particular, the U.S. FAA's views have been eagerly awaited: a draft was released in February 2015 following a period during which there were a few case-by-case exemptions granted to a blanket ban. Such regulation has a big influence over the fate of drone hardware manufacturers, component makers and a raft of providers of software platforms and services who are developing offers in the expectation of market take-off.

Despite the rapid progress in the drone market in the last two to three years, in many respects there are still more challenges than solution, still more questions than answers. But there is progress being made in many areas - particularly on the technology side and in clarifying market structures and value.

The major brake on the development of commercial drones is regulation: We have waited a long time for the FAA to produce its draft rules (though several exemptions from current restrictions in the U.S. have been granted), and most other countries' regulations are similarly restrictive. Until the regulations are clear, and resolves issues relating to autonomous flight and control beyond line-of-sight, commercial drones will not fulfil their potential.

There may be too many technology companies chasing too small a market for the next five years and we expect to see the start of consolidation in 2016 as drone hardware and, particularly, software startups' early stages funding runs out. The experience of Octoblu and its acquisition by Citrix - which surely has ideas much wider than drone management - is a lesson. There are lots of good technology developments happening out there, and they won't go to waste, but there will be fewer drone-focused tech companies standing this time next year.

‘Connected Drones... Seriously’ examines the emerging market for commercial, connected drones. It describes the emerging value chains and functional stratification of the technologies that make up a modern connected drone. It examines the most significant issues facing the commercial drone sector - in particular related to connectivity - and summarizes what is happening in the development of drones as network nodes. It reviews the supply-side landscape of the industry, and profiles 14 companies - from very small start-ups to giant technology corporates - that are working in the connected drone space.

Sample research data from the report is shown in the excerpts below:

Specific roles in the industry are becoming clearer as the small-drone industry develops from a hobbyist base to a commercial and professional market, as the military drone industry looks to expand into commercial opportunities and as new applications for drones are developed. Hobbyists initially bought drones to fly them; now they are much more likely to want the drone to be an enabler of some other activity, often involving photography or video filming. And the photography/videoing is also itself a means to an end for many users. Furthermore, the vertically integrated drone solutions typical of the military approach aren't necessarily right in a more price-sensitive, open-culture civilian world.

Excerpt:
Layers & Functional Blocks of Connected Drones

                        Heavy Reading Insider

Report Highlights

  • Drone and sensor technology is developing at a pace that means an "Internet of Flying Things" is emerging, with requirements familiar totraditional IoT/M2M markets
  • The drone market is becoming layered, and specialists are occupying new positions in an evolving technology stack
  • Cellular networks and cloud-based platforms are emerging as significant parts of that stack
  • Military and hobbyist companies, startups and IoT/M2M companies all bring ideas to the connected drone table
  • Drones used as network nodes are being developed, but significant technology challenges remain and information is scarce
  • The U.S. FAA's recent draft regulations for drones may dent, but not fatally damage, the market for commercial drone services and systems

Companies profiled in this report include: AeroVironment Inc. (Nasdaq: AVAV); Airware (Unmanned Innovation Inc.); The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA); Da-Jiang Innovations Science and Technology Co. Ltd. (DJI); DreamHammer Inc.; DroneDeploy (Infatics Inc.); Facebook Inc. (Nasdaq: FB); Google Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG); Matternet Inc.; Northrop Grumman Corp. (NYSE: NOC); Parrot SA (Euronext: PARRO); PixiePath Corp.; SkyCatch Inc.; and Skydio Inc.

Table of Contents

I. Introduction: Commercial Drones Taking Off?

II. Functional Separation, Platform Plays & Communication

III. Emerging Issues for Connected Drones

  • Flight Control & Autonomy
  • "Sense & Avoid" Systems
  • Application Data Requirements
  • Regulation

IV. Drones as Network Nodes

  • V. Supply-Side Overview

VI. Supplier Profiles

  • AeroVironment
  • Airware
  • Boeing/Insitu
  • DJI
  • DreamHammer
  • DroneDeploy
  • Facebook/Ascenta
  • Google/Titan Aerospace
  • Matternet
  • Northrop Grumman
  • Parrot/senseFly
  • PixiePath
  • SkyCatch
  • Skydio

VII. Conclusions

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