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IPv6転換へ舵を取るケーブルオペレーター

Navigating Cable's IPv6 Transition

発行 Heavy Reading 商品コード 263965
出版日 ページ情報 英文 35 Pages
納期: 即日から翌営業日
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IPv6転換へ舵を取るケーブルオペレーター Navigating Cable's IPv6 Transition
出版日: 2013年03月07日 ページ情報: 英文 35 Pages
概要

IPv4アドレスの不足が迫り、多くのケーブルオペレーターや他のブロードバンドサービスプロバイダーは、IPv4からより幅広いIPv6プロトコルへのアップグレードに何年も取り組んでいます

当レポートでは、ケーブルオペレーターが既存のケーブルブロードバンド顧客向けIPv4アドレスをサポートしながら、IPv6へアップグレードする際の技術上・運営上の課題について調査しており、IPv4とIPv6の共存および転換の実行をサポートするのに用いられるさまざまな技術、技法およびツールの調査、主要企業のIPv6転換への取り組みの例、主要ベンダーのプロファイルなどをまとめ、概略以下の構成でお届けいたします。

第1章 イントロダクション・主な調査結果

第2章 IPV6への移行

  • IPV6の背後にある促進因子
  • IPV6のメリット

第3章 ケーブルオペレーターにとっての主な転換の課題

  • 不適合の問題
  • 運営の問題

第4章 5つの主要な転換方法

  • ネイティブデュアルスタック
  • NAT444
  • デュアルスタックライト
  • IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6rd)
  • 6to4/トンネルブローカー(Teredo)

第5章 開始

  • 一般的な提案
  • フォーカスポイント

第6章 ケーブルオペレーターの初期の転換への取り組み

  • CableLabs
  • Comcast
  • Time Warner Cable
  • Cox Communications

第7章 ベンダープロファイル

  • A10 Networks
  • Arris Group
  • Casa Systems
  • Cisco Systems
  • Incognito Software
  • Juniper Networks
  • Motorola Mobility
  • Netgear
  • Sigma Systems
  • Technicolor

第9章 結論

付録A:著者について

付録B:免責事項

図表リスト

目次

The clock is rapidly ticking down for Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), the Internet's longtime communications protocol. With the number of broadband subscribers steadily expanding, the number of IP-enabled devices exploding and the number of IP-enabled services soaring, the Internet is quickly running out of available IPv4 addresses.

Indeed, two of the world's five Regional Internet Registries - the ones covering Europe and the Asia/Pacific region - have already tapped into their last IPv4 address blocks and have no more new IPv4 addresses to distribute. The North American registry is expected to exhaust its supply of IPv4 addresses in the next year or so, followed by Latin America and Africa. So, even though IPv4 has not disappeared from the Internet yet (and will likely not disappear anytime soon), it is time for cable operators and other broadband service providers to say goodbye to IPv4 and say hello to the successor Internet addressing standard, IPv6.

Excerpt 1: Dwindling IPv4 Addresses

Source: potaroo.net

Due to the looming shortage of IPv4 addresses, many cable operators and other broadband service providers around the globe have been working to upgrade from IPv4 to the much broader IPv6 protocol for years. Led in the U.S. by Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Cox Communications, some cable providers are even starting to roll out IPv6 to significant numbers of their customers. But other service providers are lagging well behind the pace set by these IPv6 leaders, tempting the fates as the number of available IPv4 addresses starts dwindling down to a precious few.

The advantages of upgrading from IPv4 to IPv6 are abundantly clear. The newer, broader IPv6 protocol has far more IP addresses than the 30-year-old IPv4 protocol. IPv6 also eliminates the primary need for the network address translation (NAT) techniques that have been used for years to stretch the IPv4 address roster. Moreover, IPv6 greatly simplifies the address assignment process now used for IPv4, while simplifying the network renumbering process as well.

But the big problem with IPv6 is that it is technically incompatible with IPv4, which means that service providers can't use one protocol version to communicate with the other. Further, cable operators must support their tens of millions of existing broadband subscribers with legacy IPv4-only equipment. Finally, various ISPs, including cable operators, will undoubtedly upgrade to IPv6 at different times and different rates, potentially causing communication problems between the various broadband networks.

As a result, cable operators must take a careful migration approach that fosters the peaceful coexistence of these two conflicting protocols. Specifically, providers must weigh the use of such transition methods as Native Dual-Stack, NAT444, Dual-Stack Lite and IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6rd) to ease the IPv6 upgrade path, choosing the techniques or combination of technologies that will work best for them.

Navigating Cable's IPv6 Transition explores the technical and operational challenges for cable operators of upgrading to IPv6 while supporting IPv4 addresses for their existing cable broadband customers. The report examines the different technologies, techniques and tools that cable providers can use to support the coexistence of IPv4 and IPv6 and carry out the transition, drawing on insights from industry experts at CableLabs, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Cox. It compares and contrasts the different transition methods and recommends ways to choose among the approaches. The report also spells out concrete, incremental steps that cable operators can take to start preparing for the IPv6 era immediately.

The report also explores the IPv6 transition efforts of CableLabs and the three biggest U.S. MSOs and profiles the leading equipment and software providers in the cable IPv6 space.

The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 presents a number of challenges for cable operators, just as it does for other broadband service providers. In this section, we'll address the major upgrade obstacles for MSOs. The excerpt below provides a summary of the operational challenges of the IPv6 transition.

Excerpt 2: Some Major IPv6 Challenges for Cable

CHALLENGEEXPLANATION
Technical incompatibilityIPv6 is not backward compatible with IPv4, so IPv4-enabled devices can't run on IPv6 Web servers
CPE availabilityMost older CE devices are only IPv4-enabled, so they can't be accessed by IPv6 servers
Content availabilityMost websites do not have IPv6-enabled content, so IPv6 content still accounts for just a tiny sliver of overall Web traffic
IPv4 coexistenceMost cable subscribers still have IPv4-enabled equipment and use IPv4-only websites, so cable operators must support both communications protocols for an indefinite time
IP address prefix delegationCMTS devices must learn how to distribute large blocks (prefixes) of IP addresses via DHCP, while the DHCP servers must learn how large a block to hand out

Source: Heavy Reading

REPORT SCOPE & STRUCTURE

Navigating the Cable IPv6 Transition is structured as follows:

Section I is an introduction to the report, with complete report key findings.

Section II spells out the benefits offered by the IPv6 protocol. It explains why cable operators should start making the transition to the new protocol immediately, if they haven't started already, and the potential perils if they do not.

Section III runs through the major challenges that cable operators face as they try to take the leap to IPv6. It highlights many of the technical and operational changers that operators must carry out.

Section IV examines the five main IPv6 transition methods available to cable operators and other broadband service providers. It compares and contrasts the different transition approaches.

Section V recommends the transition approaches that cable providers should consider the most. It discusses when each method makes sense and suggests steps that other major market players, such as CE makers, should take.

Section VI focuses on how cable operators can get started on the IPv6 transition effort. It spells out concrete, incremental steps that providers can take.

Section VII looks at the cable industry's early transition efforts. Specifically, it delves into what CableLabs and the three biggest U.S. MSOs - Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Cox Communications - are doing on the IPv6 transition front.

Section VIII offers profiles of the leading equipment and software providers in the cable IPv6 space. It runs through the products and solutions that each vendor is promoting.

Section IX provides a short conclusion wrapping up the report's main points. It highlights the moves that cable operators should make to prepare for the IPv6 era.

Navigating the Cable IPv6 Transition is published in PDF format.

Table of Contents

LIST OF FIGURES

I. INTRODUCTION & KEY FINDINGS

  • 1.1. Key Findings
  • 1.2. Report Scope & Structure

II. THE SHIFT TO IPV6

  • 2.1. Drivers Behind IPv6
  • 2.2. Benefits of IPv6

III. MAJOR TRANSITION CHALLENGES FOR CABLE

  • 3.1. Incompatibility Issues
  • 3.2. Operational Issues

IV. FIVE MAIN TRANSITION METHODS

  • 4.1. Native Dual-Stack
  • 4.2. NAT444
  • 4.3. Dual-Stack Lite
  • 4.4. IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6rd)
  • 4.5. 6to4/Tunnel Broker (Teredo)

V. CHOOSING THE RIGHT APPROACH

  • 5.1. Native Dual-Stack vs. the Rest
  • 5.2. Upgrading CE Devices

VI. GETTING STARTED

  • 6.1. General Suggestions
  • 6.2. Focus Points

VII. CABLE'S EARLY TRANSITION EFFORTS

  • 7.1. CableLabs
  • 7.2. Comcast
  • 7.3. Time Warner Cable
  • 7.4. Cox Communications

VIII. VENDOR PROFILES

  • 8.1. A10 Networks
  • 8.2. Arris Group
  • 8.3. Casa Systems
  • 8.4. Cisco Systems
  • 8.5. Incognito Software
  • 8.6. Juniper Networks
  • 8.7. Motorola Mobility
  • 8.8. Netgear
  • 8.9. Sigma Systems
  • 8.10. Technicolor

IX. CONCLUSION

APPENDIX A: ABOUT THE AUTHOR

APPENDIX B: LEGAL DISCLAIMER

LIST OF FIGURES

SECTION I

  • Figure 1.1: Dwindling IPv4 Addresses

SECTION II

  • Figure 2.1: Growth in IPv6-Enabled Fixed & Mobile Devices
  • Figure 2.2: IPv6 vs. IPv4 Feature Comparison

SECTION III

  • Figure 3.1: Incompatibility of IPv4 & IPv6
  • Figure 3.2: Some Major IPv6 Challenges for Cable

SECTION IV

  • Figure 4.1: Native Dual-Stack Technical Diagram
  • Figure 4.2: NAT444 Technical Diagram
  • Figure 4.3: Dual-Stack Lite Technical Diagram
  • Figure 4.4: IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6rd) Technical Diagram
  • Figure 4.5: 6to4/Tunnel Broker Technical Diagram
  • Figure 4.6: Comparing the Five Main Transition Methods

SECTION V

  • Figure 5.1: Ranking the Five Main Transition Methods

SECTION VI

SECTION VII

  • Figure 7.1: MSO Activity on IPv6 Front

SECTION VIII

  • Figure 8.1: Comparing the Vendors
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