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市場調査レポート - 247709

臨床検査室テスト その2:検査室テスト、事業トレンド、戦略に向き合う主要参入企業

Clinical Laboratory Testing Volume 2: Key Players for Laboratory Testing, Business Trends and Strategies

発行 TriMark Publications
出版日 ページ情報 英文 134 Pages
価格
臨床検査室テスト その2:検査室テスト、事業トレンド、戦略に向き合う主要参入企業 Clinical Laboratory Testing Volume 2: Key Players for Laboratory Testing, Business Trends and Strategies
出版日: 2012年07月01日 ページ情報: 英文 134 Pages
概要

臨床検査室テストは、医療分野で最も重要な分野の1つですが、一般に医療診断労力の70%を占めるにもかかわらず、支出額では全体の5%未満。『臨床検査室テスト』は通常、簡易な手段で採取した血液、血清、血・リンパ漿、尿、唾液など体液に含まれるタンパク質、糖質、脂質、電解質、酵素、小分子の濃度や活性度を判定する作業を指す言葉です。

当レポートでは、臨床検査室テスト市場の特定セグメントおよび検査関連企業が新たな商機の開発に向けて採用している戦略を探りながら、台頭しつつある事業手法や有力企業間ですでに結ばれた、あるいは近い将来に予定されている提携・協力関係を検証するとともに、臨床検査室事業の将来性を占う最新の産業データを集め、概略以下の構成でお届けします。

第1章 概要

  • レポートの目的
  • 調査方法
  • レポートの対象市場
  • エグゼクティブサマリー

第2章 体外診断薬(IVD)臨床検査室テスト市場

  • イントロダクション
  • 独立臨床検査機関
  • 医療支出
  • メディケア(保険適用)臨床検査サービスの支出トレンド

第3章 臨床検査室テスト市場

  • 米国市場
    • 病院内臨床検査室
    • 商業臨床検査室テスト
    • 内科医院検査室(POL)
  • 臨床検査室テスト主要参入企業
    • 商業臨床検査施設
    • 病院内検査室共同事業
    • 専門検査施設
  • 収益と報酬
  • 臨床検査室テスト市場の将来見通し
    • 長期的変化
    • 市場推進要因
    • 臨床検査施設経営成功への障壁
    • 重要技術
    • 結論

第4章 臨床検査室テスト市場における注目分野

  • 職場薬物乱用テスト
  • 臨床中毒学
  • 製薬企業向け治験
  • ビタミンDテスト
  • 糖尿病(グルコース)テスト
  • 分子診断テスト
  • 心臓マーカー
  • 血液銀行スクリーニング
  • 遺伝子テスト
  • 治療薬予測テスト
  • テーラーメイド医療
  • 癌検査
  • ポイントオブケアテスト
  • モニタリングテスト
  • 解剖病理学
  • 免疫診断学
  • アヘン検査

第5章 重要臨床検査室テスト技術トレンド

  • 臨床検査室テストにおける技術プラットフォーム革新
  • 新パラダイム
  • 統合ワークステーション
  • 検査施設の自動化
  • 検査室情報システム
  • 新たな使いやすいインターフェース
  • 情報管理問題

第6章 臨床検査室テスト分野における事業トレンド

  • 重要展開
  • 分野の再編
  • 事業買収価格
  • 病院内検査室に対する競争の脅威
  • 事業買収、ライセンス契約、内部開発、提携
  • 臨床検査室テスト業界におけるM&A、提携活動
  • QuestとLabCorpの比較
  • 臨床検査施設の規制
  • 病院支援プログラム
  • サプライチェーンと集団購買組織(GPO)契約
  • 専門検査施設
  • 病院内検査室と病院支援プログラムの拡大
  • 管理医療

第7章 企業プロフィール

第8章 臨床検査室テスト分野の動向と予測

第9章 重要臨床検査施設事業戦略

  • 戦略1:事業買収
  • 戦略2:並行事業開発
  • 戦略3:施設拡大
  • 戦略4:専門分野テストの開発
  • 戦略5:マーケティング
  • 戦略6:臨床検査室テスト市場内の独自性あるポジションに投資
  • 戦略7:利用情報提供の第一人者に
  • 戦略8:科学的差別化を
  • 戦略9:品質向上を
  • 戦略10:すぐれた患者体験の提供
目次

Abstract

Description

Clinical laboratory testing is one of the most important sectors of medical care. Although it is generally involved in over 70% of medical diagnoses, it accounts for less than 5% of overall healthcare expenditures. The term clinical laboratory testing usually refers to determining the concentration or activity of a protein, carbohydrate, lipid, electrolyte, enzyme or small molecule in easily collected body fluids such as blood, serum, plasma, urine and saliva. This TriMark Publications report describes the specific segments of the clinical laboratory testing business and the strategies used by laboratory companies to develop new business opportunities. The study presents emerging business practices and analyzes the partnerships and alliances that various key sector players have forged or could forge in the near future. New clinical laboratory business methods are also examined to identify lead positions and potential future growth areas. Moreover, the report profiles leading companies in the clinical laboratory industry, with a primary focus on companies that actively analyze and market laboratory data.

Methodology

The author of this report is a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota with mans decades of experience in scientific writing and as a medical industry analyst. He has been a senior director of se cml large regional and national healthcare laboratories. He has over 30 years of experience in laboratory testing and instrument and reagent development technology as a licensed clinical laboraton director, as well as extensive experience in senior level management positions in biotech and niedictil sen ice companies. The editor has a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, with postdoctoral work in clinical assay development and validation conibined with molecular biology, and has worked in small and large pharmaceutical companies in the department of drug safet e aluation to support eflbrts in drug discovery and for commercialization of new chemical entities as drugs for over 15 sears.

Company-specific information is obtained mainly from industry trade publications, academic journals, news and research articles, press releases and corporate websites, as well as annual reports for publicly-held firms. Additionally, sources of infoimation include the non-governmental organi/ations (NGOs) such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and governmental entities like the U.S. Department of Hlealth and Human Services (HHS) and U.S. federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC). Where possible and practicable, the most recent data available have been used.

Some of the statistical information was taken from Biotechnology Associates' databases and from TriMark's private data stores. The information in this study was obtained from sources that we believe to be reliable, but we do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information or omission or for the results obtained by the use of such infonnation. Key information from the business literature was used as a basis to conduct dialogue with and obtain expert opinion from market professionals regarding commercial potential and market sizes.

Primary Sourcesc

TriMark collects information from hundreds of Database Tables and many comprehensive multi-client research projects, as well as Sector Snapshots that we publish annually. We extract relevant data and analytics from TriMark' s research as part of this data collection.

Secondary Sources

TriMark uses research publications, journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, industry reports, investment research reports, trade and industry association reports, government-affiliated trade releases and other published information as part of its secondary research materials. The information is then analyzed and translated by the Industry Research Group into a TriMark study. The Editorial Group reviews the complete package with product and market forecasts, critical industry trends, threats and opportunities, competitive strategies and market share determinations.

Table of Contents

1. Overview

  • 1.1. Objectives of the Report
  • 1.2. Methodology
  • 1.3. Scope of the Report
  • 1.4. Executive Summary

2. IVD Clinical Laboratory Testing Market

  • 2.1. Introduction
  • 2.2. Independent Clinical Labs
    • 2.2.1. Key Players for Independent Clinical Labs
  • 2.3. Medical Expenditures
  • 2.4. Medicare Clinical Lab Services Spending Trends

3. The Clinical Laboratory Testing Market

  • 3.1. U.S. Market
    • 3.1.1. Hospital-based Clinical Laboratories
    • 3.1.2. Commercial Clinical Laboratory Testing
    • 3.1.3. Physician Office Laboratories (POLs)
  • 3.2. Clinical Lab Testing Key Players
    • 3.2.1. Commercial Clinical Labs
    • 3.2.2. Hospital Lab Collaborative Ventures
    • 3.2.3. Specialty Labs
  • 3.3. Revenue and Reimbursement
  • 3.4. Outlook for Clinical Laboratory Testing
    • 3.4.1. Long-term Changes
    • 3.4.2. Market Drivers
    • 3.4.3. Barriers to Successful Clinical Laboratory Operations
    • 3.4.4. Key Technologies
    • 3.4.5. Conclusion

4. Hot Sectors in the Clinical Lab Testing Market

  • 4.1. Workplace Drugs-of-Abuse Testing
  • 4.2. Clinical Toxicology
  • 4.3. Clinical Testing for the Pharmaceutical Industry
  • 4.4. Vitamin D Testing
  • 4.5. Diabetes (Glucose) Testing
  • 4.6. Molecular Diagnostic Testing
  • 4.7. Cardiac Markers
  • 4.8. Blood Bank Screening
  • 4.9. Genetic Testing
  • 4.10. Predictive Medicine Testing
  • 4.11. Personalized Medicine
  • 4.12. Cancer Testing
  • 4.13. Point of Care Testing
  • 4.14. Monitoring Testing
  • 4.15. Anatomic Pathology
  • 4.16. Immunodiagnostics
  • 4.17. Opiate Testing

5. Important Clinical Lab Testing Technology Trends

  • 5.1. Technology Platform Innovations in Clinical Lab Testing
  • 5.2. The New Paradigm
  • 5.3. Consolidated Workstations
  • 5.4. Automation in the Laboratory
  • 5.5. Laboratory Information Systems
  • 5.6. New User-friendly Interface
  • 5.7. Data-Management Issues
    • 5.7.1. Wireless LANs
    • 5.7.2. Data and Workflow Management Systems
    • 5.7.3. Beckman Central Command
    • 5.7.4. Clinical IT More Widely Available in Physician Practices
    • 5.7.5. Physician Electronic Health Records (EHRs)
    • 5.7.6. Specimen Tracking and Processing

6. Business Trends in the Clinical Laboratory Testing Sector

  • 6.1. Key Developments
  • 6.2. Sector Consolidation
  • 6.3. Acquisition Pricing
  • 6.4. Hospital Lab Competition Threats
  • 6.5. Acquisition, License Agreements, Internal Development and Partnerships
  • 6.6. Merger, Acquisition and Partnering Activities in the Clinical Lab Testing Industry
  • 6.7. Comparison of Quest and LabCorp
    • 6.7.1. Acquisitions
    • 6.7.2. Quest's Growth
    • 6.7.3. Laboratory Corporation of America
    • 6.7.4. LabCorp's Growth
    • 6.7.5. Competitive Advantages of National Labs like Quest and LabCorp
    • 6.7.6. National Managed Care Companies
    • 6.7.7. Billing and Collection Management
    • 6.7.8. Lower Reagent and Supply Costs
    • 6.7.9. Esoteric Testing Capabilities
    • 6.7.10. Ability to Invest in Web-based Connectivity Solutions
    • 6.7.11. Competitive Disadvantages of Quest and LabCorp
    • 6.7.12. Difficulties with Turnaround Times and Stat Services
    • 6.7.13. Physician-Laboratory Communication
    • 6.7.14. Specimen Pickup Scheduling Inflexibility
  • 6.8. Regulation of Clinical Laboratory Operations
    • 6.8.1. CLIA and State Regulations
    • 6.8.2. Drug Testing
    • 6.8.3. Controlled Substances
    • 6.8.4. Medical Waste, Hazardous Waste and Radioactive Materials
    • 6.8.5. FDA
    • 6.8.6. Occupational Safety
    • 6.8.7. Specimen Transportation
    • 6.8.8. Corporate Practice of Medicine
  • 6.9. Hospital Outreach Programs
  • 6.10. Supply Chain and GPO Contracting
  • 6.11. Specialty Labs
  • 6.12. Expansion of Hospital-based Labs and Hospital Outreach Programs
  • 6.13. Managed Care

7. Company Profiles

  • 7.1. ACM Medical Laboratory
  • 7.2. Alere
  • 7.3. American Esoteric Laboratories (Sonic Healthcare)
  • 7.4. American Pathology Partners
  • 7.5. AmeriPath (Quest)
  • 7.6. ARUP Laboratories
  • 7.7. Athena Diagnostics
  • 7.8. Aurora Diagnostics
  • 7.9. Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc.
  • 7.10. BioTech MedLab
  • 7.11. Caris Diagnostics
  • 7.12. CBLPath
  • 7.13. Centrex Clinical Laboratories
  • 7.14. Clarient, Inc.
  • 7.15. Clinical Reference Laboratory
  • 7.16. Clongen Laboratories, LLC
  • 7.17. CompuNet Clinical Laboratories
  • 7.18. EndoChoice Pathways
  • 7.19. Enzo Biochem, Inc.
  • 7.20. Esoterix (LabCorp)
  • 7.21. Exagen Diagnostics
  • 7.22. Geneva Laboratories
  • 7.23. Genomic Health, Inc.
  • 7.24. Genzyme
  • 7.25. IBT Laboratories
  • 7.26. Integrated Regional Laboratories (IRL)
  • 7.27. LabCorp
  • 7.28. MEDTOX Scientific, Inc.
  • 7.29. Meriter Health Services
  • 7.30. Mid America Clinical Laboratories (MACL)
  • 7.31. Monogram Biosciences, Inc.
  • 7.32. Myriad Genetics, Inc.
  • 7.33. National Jewish Medical and Research Center
  • 7.34. Parkway Clinical Laboratories
  • 7.35. Pathology, Inc.
  • 7.36. Predictive Biosciences
  • 7.37. Psychemedics Corporation
  • 7.38. Quest Diagnostics, Inc.
  • 7.39. RDL Reference Laboratory
  • 7.40. Satellite Laboratory Services
  • 7.41. Signal Genetics
  • 7.42. Solstas Lab Partners
  • 7.43. Sonic Healthcare
  • 7.44. Spectra

8. Clinical Laboratory Testing Sector Trends and Forecasts

  • 8.1. Home Care Analysis
  • 8.2. Non-Traditional Collection for Laboratory Testing
  • 8.3. New Systems for Critical-Care and Near-Patient Testing
  • 8.4. Shift to Preventative Medicine
  • 8.5. Mergers of Diagnostic Companies
  • 8.6. Information Management Advances
  • 8.7. Test Ordering Patterns
  • 8.8. Patient Satisfaction
  • 8.9. Move Away from Central Laboratory
  • 8.10. Healthcare Cost Controls
  • 8.11. Competition for Services
  • 8.12. Drivers and Barriers of Clinical Laboratory Testing
  • 8.13. Confluence of New Technology
  • 8.14. New Trends in Clinical Laboratory Testing
    • 8.14.1. Trends in Reimbursement Practices
    • 8.14.2. Managed Care
    • 8.14.3. Point of Care Testing
    • 8.14.4. Satellite Facilities
    • 8.14.5. Billing Practices
  • 8.15. Digital Pathology
  • 8.16. Pathology Laboratory Trends

9. Key Clinical Lab Business Strategies

  • 9.1. Strategy 1: Acquisitions
  • 9.2. Strategy 2: Parallel Businesses Development
  • 9.3. Strategy 3: Larger Labs
  • 9.4. Strategy 4: Develop Specialty Areas of Testing
  • 9.5. Strategy 5: Marketing
  • 9.6. Strategy 6: Capitalize on a Unique Position within the Clinical Testing Market
  • 9.7. Strategy 7: Lead in Providing Medical Information
  • 9.8. Strategy 8: Scientific Differentiation
  • 9.9. Strategy 9: Drive Quality
  • 9.10. Strategy 10: Deliver a Superior Patient Experience

APPENDIXES:

  • Appendix 1: Reference Laboratory Directory
  • Appendix 2: Current List of Laboratories which Meet Minimum Standards to Engage in Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies
  • Appendix 3: FDA/CLIA - Currently Waived Analytes

INDEX OF FIGURES

  • Figure 2.1: Medicare Part B Expenditures, 2005-2016
  • Figure 2.2: Part B Spending on Clinical Laboratory Services, 1991-2007
  • Figure 3.1: Lab Revenue by Lab Type
  • Figure 3.2: Lab Revenue by Test Type
  • Figure 3.3: Number of New Tests Granted CLIA-waived Status, 2000-2008
  • Figure 3.4: High-Volume Waived Tests
  • Figure 5.1: Percentage of Physicians in Practices with IT for Specific Clinical Activities, 2000-2005
  • Figure 6.1: Quest Revenue Breakdown
  • Figure 6.2: Revenue for Quest Diagnostics, 2000-2011
  • Figure 6.3: Revenue for LabCorp, 2000-2011
  • Figure 8.1: Reimbursement Distribution for Clinical Lab Service Payers

INDEX OF TABLES

  • Table 2.1: Independent Clinical Laboratories by Market Capitalization
  • Table 2.2: Top Clinical Laboratory Testing Analytes, 2011
  • Table 2.3: Drivers for Overall Medicare Spending
  • Table 2.4: Medicare Part B Expenditures, 1970-2011
  • Table 2.5: Future Projections of Medicare Part B Expenditures 2012-2080
  • Table 2.6: Medicare Spending for Clinical Lab Services, 2000-2009
  • Table 2.7: Drivers for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Spending
  • Table 3.1: U.S. Clinical Laboratory Testing Sector Revenue, 2005-2016
  • Table 3.2: U.S. Clinical Laboratory Testing Sector Segments, 2011
  • Table 3.3: Esoteric Tests Performed in the Clinical Laboratory
  • Table 3.4: Growth Rates of Test Types
  • Table 3.5: Drivers of Clinical Lab Testing Volume
  • Table 3.6: Independent Commercial Laboratory Testing Test Volume, 2005-2016
  • Table 3.7: Lab Tests Performed in Physicians Offices
  • Table 3.8: Revenue at Leading Commercial Lab Companies, 2011
  • Table 3.9: Payer Group Percentage of Total Volume of Requisitions and Net Revenues
  • Table 3.10: Barriers to Successful Clinical Lab Operations
  • Table 5.1: Applications for Wireless LAN Technology
  • Table 6.1: Clinical Laboratory M&A Activity, 2010-2012
  • Table 6.2: Major Managed Care Players for Clinical Laboratory Services
  • Table 6.3: Drivers for Managed Care Spending for Clinical Laboratory Services
  • Table 6.4: Revenue for Quest Diagnostics, 2000-2011
  • Table 6.5: Revenue for LabCorp, 2000-2011
  • Table 6.6: Clinical Lab Quality Assurance Programs
  • Table 7.1: Myriad Genetics' Laboratory Testing Menu
  • Table 8.1: Key Elements of Clinical Lab Service
  • Table 8.2: Key Competitive Activities for Clinical Lab Service
  • Table 8.3: Challenges to the Clinical Lab Testing Industry
  • Table 8.4: Medicare Billing Guidelines for Multi-channel Clinical Laboratory Tests
  • Table 8.5: Factors for Estimating Collectibility for Clinical Lab Services
  • Table 8.6: Classes of Lab Service Payers
  • Table 8.7: U.S. Revenue Forecasts for POCT Market, 2008-2018
  • Table 8.8: Billing Difficulties Required of Clinical Labs to Bill Third-Party Payers
  • Table 8.9: Drivers for Operation of In-Office Pathology Labs
  • Table 8.10: Barriers for Operation of In-Office Pathology Labs
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